JET Mining - Bitcoin Mining. Earn Bitcoin for free

Mining bitcoin in college (free electricity!)

I am working with a friend to set up a bitcoin mining rig our university. I'm a business major, but my friend is in engineering and has unlimited free access to a 220v power supply. Would it be worth buying 100 AntMiner S9's on eBay and making our own rig?
The math breaks down as follows according to https://www.cryptocompare.com/mining/calculatobtc?HashingPower=1350&HashingUnit=TH%2Fs&PowerConsumption=137500&CostPerkWh=0&MiningPoolFee=1
1350 TH/s hashrate (with 100 S9s at 13.5 TH/s for each unit)
Electricity cost is zero.
Predicted payout is $3,390/month.
Am I missing something? It seems too good to be true, making 4k/month with only 10k up front.

EDIT: Assume the rig was well hidden and not discovered for a few years.
submitted by josiahkitching to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Would I be profitable?

Hello, sorry if this is an inconvenience but I am looking into bitcoin mining, I see that this pool is good for beginners, while doing research on this topic, I have been trying to figure out if doing this would be profitable. The ASIC I’m thinking about buying costs $85, consumes $2.71 in a day in power costs and has a rate of 4 terahash a day. I am wandering if it would be possible for me to break even or make a profit within 3 years. Sorry if this is an inconvenience but I tried using a calculator and most of the terminology was confusing. Thank you.
submitted by sevenpoundsofpie to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

18 P106-100 & 1 P104-100 Mining Rig Build

18 P106-100 & 1 P104-100 Mining Rig Build

19 GPU Build with ASUS B250 Mining Expert - 470MH/s

Its my dream to achieve and build a mining rig of this extent.
Allow me to describe this journey of mine to the GPU mining community.
Kudos to all! Feel free to ask me questions and I would love to help you out.

2017 - Bull Market - Dipped my toes into the GPU mining market. Spent nearly 3k USD, 6x GTX 1060 3GB & 2x GTX 1070ti.

Back then, my setup was really simple, An ASUS B250 Mining Expert with Pentium G4400, 8GB of RAM, 2 PSU (Coolermaster 700w as well as a V1200W PSU)
Placed this entire setup on a DIY metal shelf
Bought extra 2 GTX 1060 3GB on my Ryzen 7 1700 setup back then. Mining Monero too on Cryptonight Algo. Really profitable on these 2 rigs combined. Earning approximately 35USD per day at the peak :)
Without much experience back then, my overclocking skills sucks. I was drawing a ton of power with very little efficiency. However, at that point I was literally making few hundreds every month. It has been a really wonderful journey until bear market hits.

2018 - Nicehash Hacked, Bitconnect & Bear Market Hits...

If you still remember the dreadful hack of Nicehash. One morning I woke up seeing that my rig was no longer mining. Saw my balance turned to zero. And the moment I saw this article, my heart sanked. With over 100 USD inside my account that point, I knew I wouldnt be able to pay for my electric that month. This pulled down my confidence but quite a little.
Still remember Bitconnect? Hahahaha well entered into this ponzi scheme too. Invested 100 USD into this, got it back and donated the money.
Disconnected my entire rig... It was a pretty sad moment :\")
My house became cooler, quieter and my power usage instantly went down.
Kept 1 GTX 1070ti & 1 GTX 1060 3GB and built myself a Ryzen 7 gaming computer hehe.

My disconnection from Crypto 2018-2019

I exited this market back at the very end of the bull run and never touched Bitcoin until 2019. I began to plan my future, created an investment portfolio where I finally included Bitcoin back into my high risk asset class. The resurgence of Bitcoin mining begans :)

2019 - Sold my Ryzen 7 1700 & MB for ASUS B250 Mining Expert with 19 GPU build in mind

It all started with my small mining rig of one ZOTAC GTX 1070ti as well as an ASUS B250 Mining Expert which I was using to mine Ethereum at 33MH/s, get paid 0.05eth approximately every 2 weeks on 2miners.com

Purchased 2 more GTX 1070ti, bringing my total hashrate to 130MH/s.
Revamped & Redesigned into a DIY rig. Didnt wanna spend the money to find a frame hehe decided to use my mums shoe rack instead HAHAHAH
Back then, 1 GTX 1070ti resale value was approximately 230 USD here in Singapore.
Calculated hash per dollar and I notice the insane price I was paying with my 1070tis.
Sold all 4 of my GTX 1070tis and manage to trade for the following cards:
  • x4 Gigayte RX 570 8GB cards @ 70USD
  • x1 Sapphire Nitro RX 570 8GB @ 85USD
  • x5 P106-100 6GB cards @ 63USD
4 Gigabyte RX 570, 1 Sapphire RX 570, 5 P106-100 6GB
With all the skills and experience I have accumulated in 2017, I began redesigning my entire 10 GPU setup. This was the end product of my 10 GPU mining rig consisting of 5 NVIDIA P106-100 6GB cards as wel as 5 AMD RX 570 8GB cards. Working fine alongside with one another as claimed by ASUS.
Hashrates:
  • NVIDIA P106-100 6GB: 24.8MH/s @ 85watts
  • AMD RX 570 8GB: 29MH/s @ 95watts

DEAL OF THE MONTH - ZOTAC P106-100 6GB @ 56 USD

The dream of building 19 cards were never off my brain. Been sourcing for cheaper 2nd hand cards and snap! 56 USD per card for ZOTAC P106-100. It was insanely a great deal. Sold my 5x RX 570 8GB, use the cash and baammm!
Got 8 ZOTAC P106-100 6GB (2 not in photo) for test. PERFECT CONDITION and I cant believe the speed I was getting in Ethereum. 450MH/S for 18x P106-100 6GB

2ND DEAL OF THE MONTH - P104-100 8GB @ 70 USD

Managed to achieve 35.9MH @ 124w. Bringing my total GPU to 19.

The screen all miners with B250s love to see :)
The entire setup of my 19 GPU rig. Fan is blowing at single direction, expelling all the hot air towards my door exit. Keeping my living room relatively cool.

Underclocked my rig to 466MH for better stability and power draw. Has been running fine for 2 weeks without any manual interventions.
Bought a HP 1200w PSU. Placed a 120mm fan on top of it to keep it cool. In case if you are asking how loud is it, actually its pretty quiet. I have only used 600w, half of the capacity. Hence, under full load I am not sure how loud it will be.

All in all, my journey of a 19 GPU build. Feel free to ask me any questions :)
submitted by amtf99 to gpumining [link] [comments]

How To Mine Cryptocurrencies

How To Mine Cryptocurrencies

https://preview.redd.it/zy5cy18ezfz41.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=6f519c8931a68c40f534dc3bb3d99d8d726a2758
With cryptocurrencies entering the mainstream with a bang, more and more people every single day develop an interest in this new and strange world of blockchain. A lot of these people come to cryptos because they had heard that it’s possible to make money from them. If you’re one of those people, you’re in luck, because today I want to tell you how to mine cryptocurrency.

Understanding Mining

To put it into very simple terms, crypto mining is a process in which a machine performs certain tasks to obtain a little bit of cryptocurrency. This is the biggest TL;DR possible, so let’s branch out a bit, shall we? Imagine that you have a machine that mines crypto coins. We’ll talk about the specific types of machines later on in the tutorial, but for example’s sake, let’s just say that it’s your own, personal computer and you’re trying to figure out how to mine cryptocurrency. That is a very short and simple way of defining what is cryptocurrency mining. Now let’s move on to what you came here to see; how to mine cryptocurrency.

Cryptocurrency Mining

There are a few ways you could go about cryptocurrency mining. I’ll cover the main ones here, and start from the easiest one – cloud mining.

Method #1 – Cloud Mining

If you’re looking for crypto mining ways, cloud mining is probably the most popular way to mine cryptocurrencies without having to lift a finger. Cloud mining is a process where you pay someone (most often it’s a big corporation) a specific amount of money and “rent out” their mining machine called a “rig”, and the process of mining itself. This rent lasts for an agreed-upon period, through which all of the earnings that the rig makes (minus the electricity and maintenance costs) are transferred to your cryptocurrency wallet. The people (companies) that offer these cloud mining services usually have huge mining facilities with multiple farms (tens or hundreds of rigs stacked and operating together) at their disposal and know perfectly well how to mine cryptocurrency.
Cloud mining has become so popular mainly because it offers the possibility to participate in the world of cryptocurrencies for people who might not have enough money to buy their rigs or who perhaps simply aren’t interested in owning a rig. There are two options of cloud mining – free and paid. Naturally, a lot of people that are looking for ways to mine cryptocurrency would gravitate towards the “free” options, but it does have its drawbacks (very slow mining speeds, extra conditions, etc.). Paid cloud mining usually works like this: It is usually expected that you’ll break even at around the half-a-year – one year mark, and then profit from that point onwards. No one can know for sure, though, because the prices of cryptocurrencies are very volatile and their prices tend to sway by quite a bit.

Method #2 – CPU Mining

CPU mining utilizes processors to mine cryptocurrencies. It used to be a viable option back in the day, but currently, fewer and fewer people choose this method of mining cryptocurrency daily. There are a couple of reasons why that is. First of all, CPU mining is EXTREMELY slow. You could go on for months without noticing the smallest amount of revenue. It’s also usually not worth it – you make very little amounts of money, but you probably spend ten times that amount on electricity and cooling. The problem mitigates itself by a bit if you can find a place that has nice cooling and cheap electricity bills, but that’s rarely the case.
So why do people still even use CPU mining, then?
Well, basically because anyone with a desktop computer could do it. All you need to be able to mine using the CPU method is just a computer and a couple of programs. It is possible to do it with a laptop, but it is VERY STRONGLY NOT ADVISED. Your laptop will probably fry and overheat in a matter of a couple of hours. The fact that it’s so easy to start cryptocurrency mining attracts new CPU miners every day. Some people that are looking for how to mine cryptocurrency don’t care about the details – they just want to start the process as soon as possible, and in any way possible.

Method #3 – GPU Mining

GPU mining is probably the most popular and well-known method of mining cryptocurrencies. If you google “cryptocurrency mining”, GPU rigs are going to be some of the first things that you’ll see.
Cloud miners, for example, use GPU rigs for their services. And these guys are professionals that sometimes have hundreds if not thousands of rigs, so they probably know what they’re doing, right?
GPU mining is very popular because it’s both efficient and relatively cheap. Don’t get me wrong, the construction of the rig itself tends to be costly – but when it comes to its hash speed and the general workforce, the GPU mining rig is great. GPU rigs utilize graphics cards to mine cryptocurrencies. One standard rig is made out of a processor, a motherboard, cooling, rig frame and – of course – a few (2 – 8) graphics cards.A typical price for a well-performing and nicely built GPU mining rig aims to be around the $3000 price range. It is a hefty investment but will pay off much faster than, let’s say, a CPU miner. People looking for ways to mine cryptocurrency should check them out.

Method #4 – ASIC Mining

ASICs (Application-Specific Integrated Circuits) are special devices that are designed explicitly to perform a single task, which in this case is crypto mining. ASICs are very well known and treasured because they produce insane amounts of cryptocurrency when compared to its competitors’ GPU and CPU. But if they are so good, why didn’t I mention them sooner?
Well, mostly because they’re a big subject of controversy. You see, when the ASIC company announced its new version of the machine, the announcement caused an uproar in the cryptocurrency community. Many people have called for an outright ban on these machines.
Why? Because ASICS are so powerful, they rob other miners who are using GPU or CPU rigs of the possibility to keep up both in hash speeds and in earnings. Also, ASICS have twisted the economy of certain specific cryptocurrencies – imagine if the majority of earnings would go to one miner with an ASIC farm, what kind of chaos that would ensue.

The Best Method to Mine Cryptocurrency

Now that you have an understanding of how to mine cryptocurrency and about all of the different ways to do it, which one is the best way?
The method that suits you the most depends solemnly on a few key details: are you willing to spend some initial money? If so, how much? Do you want to OWN a rig? Do you even want to do it with a rig?

Which Cryptocurrency to Mine?

Your choice of gear should also depend on the type of cryptocurrency mining that you’ve decided to do. Some of the obvious favorites would be Bitcoin, Ethereum or Dash. Keep in mind, though, that Bitcoin mining is probably the trickiest of them all – since the coin is so popular, there are many miners around the world tuning into the few pools that there are and trying to snatch at least a small bit of Bitcoin. This might result in you waiting for countless hours until the first drops of Bitcoin start coming in.
Keeping that in mind, your best bet would probably be to stick with Ethereum or some other less-popular cryptocurrency. Depending on your method of choice, check out the prices, calculate when your return on investment would happen, do some math and you’ll figure it out in no time!

Conclusion

As you’ve probably noticed, there are many different ways on how to mine cryptocurrency. These are simply the main methods – if you’d like, you could even forget about mining and jump into Bitcoin faucets – but that’s a whole different story for a whole different day. But it’s an option!
One thing that you should not only remember, but also do right away is to create a cryptocurrency wallet. Decide on the type of cryptocurrency that you want to mine and simply look up the wallet options for that currency. You’ll have no problems finding one for coins like Bitcoin, Ethereum or Litecoin, but if you want to mine the less-known currencies, then you might need to search for a bit until you find a reputable wallet.
Getting a secure and reputable wallet is the most important task when you’re starting with cryptocurrency mining. Imagine if you’d be mining for a year and all of your savings would be stolen only because you didn’t pay enough attention while choosing the wallet and picked a fishy one that got hacked into.
If you’re serious and are looking for ways on how to mine cryptocurrency, I would suggest buying a hardware wallet – they are the safest and most trustworthy cryptocurrency wallets out there.
Well, this is the end of my tutorial on crypto mining. We’ve covered a few different topics and explored the different varieties of cryptocurrency mining methods. Remember – the method that suits you the most will depend solemnly on what you want and what kind of resources you have, so choose carefully! If you do decide on giving mining a chance, I wish you the best of luck!
submitted by everus-world to u/everus-world [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Guide

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Guide
Happy Mining!

All available XRC pools can be found on MiningPoolStats

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Hardware

Baikal Giant+: 1.6 GH/s
Baikal Quad Cube: 1.2 GH/s
Baikal Giant: 900 MH/s
Baikal Quadruple Mini Miner: 600 MH/s
Baikal Miner Cube: 300 MH/s
Baikal Mini Miner: 150 MH/s

Mining Setup

To mine Bitcoin Rhodium you need to set up an XRC wallet and configure your miner of choice. You can choose between Web wallet, Electrum-XRC or Magnum wallet. To set up a web wallet please visit wallet.bitcoinrh.org. Or download and install Electrum-XRC wallet (recommended) for Windows, Linux and MacOS.
Web wallet: wallet.bitcoinrh.org
Electrum-XRC wallet: electrum.bitcoinrh.org
Magnum wallet: https://magnumwallet.co

Sign up for XRC web wallet if not yet done so

  1. Create an account, with your username, password and secure question.
  2. Sign in and click “Create Wallet”.
  3. Set up a strong transaction password. Make sure you store it securely in a secure password manager of choice.
  4. Copy the seed somewhere safe. It’d be a good idea to write seed on a hardcopy and keep it safe.
  5. Paste it to confirm you got it right.
  6. Grab an address for the mining step. Your wallet is now ready to mine XRC.

Instructions for mining XRC on the official pool

Pool link: poolcore.bitcoinrh.org
  1. Any miner that supports X13 will be able to mine XRC. We have a few examples below of miners that are well tested with Bitcoin Rhodium network.
  2. For any miner, configure the miner to point to:
(0–0.8 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3061
(0.8–2 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062
(3–4 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3063
(5+ GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3064
with your XRC address as username and x as password. You don’t need to open an account on pool. You will be mining to XRC address and mined coins will be transferred to your wallet
after blocks reach 10 block maturity
after you mined up minimal amount of coins (currently 0.1 XRC)
sometimes mined blocks could get rejected by network (orphaned) after they were counted as valid blocks. This is normal network behavior to follow longest chain
  1. http://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org is used to follow your miner and network statistics.

CPU Miner-Multi

Source: https://github.com/tpruvot/cpuminer-multi
Sample configuration with CPU Miner tested on UBUNTU.
{
“url” : “stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3061”, “user” : “YOUR XRC ADDRESS”,
“pass” : “x”,
“algo” : “x13”, “threads” : 1,
“cpu-priority” : 5,
“cpu-affinity” : 1, “benchmark” : false, “debug” : true, “protocol”: true, “show-diff”: true, “quiet” : false
}
Command to run your CPUMiner: cpuminer -c cpuminer.json

SGMiner (ATI GPU)

SGMiner is a GPU-based mine: https://github.com/nicehash/sgminereleases
The configuration below was tested on Windows:
setx GPU_FORCE_64BIT_PTR 0
setx GPU_MAX_HEAP_SIZE 100
setx GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS 1
setx GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
setx GPU_SINGLE_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
cd C:\Software\sgminer-5.6.1-nicehash-51-windowsamd64 sgminer.exe
— gpu-platform 1 — algorithm x13mod -url stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh. org:3062 — pool-user — userpass :x — auto-fan — temp-target 70 — temp-over- heat 82 — temp-cutoff 85 — gpu-fan 65–85 — log-file log.txt — no-adl — no-extra- nonce -P –T

CCMiner (NVIDIA GPU)

CCMiner is a GPU-based miner (NVIDIA)
Command to run your CCMINER:
ccminer-x64.exe -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062 -O :without -D — show-diff

Baikal miner

Settings: Url:
(0–2 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062
(3–4 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3063
(5+ GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3064
Algo: x13User: your XRC receiving address (make sure you set 2 distinct addresses for each hashing board)
Pass: x
Extranonce: leave off Priority set to 0 and 1
Once pool stratum address and your wallet as user are set up you should see your miner mining against XRC pool. When miner is working the status column is green. The pool and miner are incorrectly configured now as status says “Dead” highlighted in red.

Instructions for mining XRC on BSOD pool

Pool link: bsod.pw/en/pool/dashboard/XRC/
Use this code for your miner: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig
BSOD pool allows both solo and party mining.
For solo mining use code: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig -p m=solo And for party mining use: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig -p m=party.yourpassword
NOTICE: You can use us for North America and asia for Asia instead of euin your .bat file or config.
You can also use BSOD pool’s monitor app for Android and iOS.

Instructions for mining XRC on ZERGPOOL

Zergpool offers low fees (just 0.5%) and also SOLO and PARTY mining with no extra fees.
To mine XRC on Zergpool use this command lines for your miner:
Regular: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC Solo: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC,m=solo Party: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC,m=party
Use your coin wallet address as username in mining software. Specify c=SYMBOL as password to identify payout wallet coin, and the same coin in mc=SYMBOL to specify mining coin.
For more information and support please visit http://zergpool.com
Notice that when there are more pools mining XRC in different geographic/availability locations choose the nearest to you as lowest priority and then add desirable fall back pool options in different geographic locations or pools. This is useful when one pool experiences issues, to fall back to different pool in Bitcoin Rhodium network.

Calculate your Bitcoin Rhodium mining profitability

WhatToMine: https://whattomine.com/coins/317-xrc-x13
CoinCalculators: https://www.coincalculators.io/coin/bitcoin-rhodium

Feel free to ask questions in Discord community. There are lots of helpful people around the world watching XRC 24x7.

Bitcoin Rhodium Dev Team
submitted by BitcoinRh to BitcoinRhodium [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency: A Guide to Common Tax Situations

STATUS: Majority of questions have been answered. If yours got missed, please feel free to post it again.
Introduction
All,
Based on the rapid increase in popularity and price of bitcoin and other crypto currencies (particularly over the past year), I expect that lots of people have questions about how crypto currency will impact their taxes. This thread attempts to address several common issues. I'm posting similar versions of it here, in several major crypto subs, and eventually in the weekly "tax help" threads personalfinance runs.
I'd like to thank the /personalfinance mod team and the /tax community for their help with this thread and especially for reading earlier versions and offering several valuable suggestions/corrections.
This thread is NOT an endorsement of crypto currency as an investing strategy. There is a time and a place to debate the appropriateness of crypto as part of a diversified portfolio - but that time is not now and that place is not here. If you are interested in the general consensus of this sub on investing, I would urge you to consult the wiki while keeping in mind the general flowchart outlining basic steps to get your finances in order.
Finally, please note that this thread attempts to provide information about your tax obligations as defined by United States law (and interpreted by the IRS under the direction of the Treasury Department). I understand that a certain portion of the crypto community tends to view crypto as "tax free" due to the (actual and perceived) difficulty for the IRS to "know" about the transactions involved. I will not discuss unlawfully concealing crypto gains here nor will I suggest illegal tax avoidance activities.
The Basics
This section is best for people that don't understand much about taxes. It covers some very basic tax principles. It also assumes that all you did during the year was buy/sell a single crypto currency.
Fundamentally, the IRS treats crypto not as money, but as an asset (investment). While there are a few specific "twists" when it comes to crypto, when in doubt replace the word "crypto" with the word "stock" and you will get a pretty good idea how you should report and pay tax on crypto.
The first thing you should know is that the majority of this discussion applies to the taxes you are currently working on (2017 taxes). The tax bill that just passed applies to 2018 taxes (with a few very tiny exceptions), which most people will file in early 2019.
In general, you don't have to report or pay taxes on crypto currency holdings until you "cash out" all or part of your holdings. For now, I'm going to assume that you cash out by selling them for USD; however, other forms of cashing out will be covered later.
When you sell crypto, you report the difference between your basis (purchase price) and proceeds (sale price) on Schedule D. Your purchase price is commonly referred to as your basis; while the two terms don't mean exactly the same thing, they are pretty close to one another (in particular, there are three two ways to calculate your basis - your average cost, a first-in, first-out method, and a "specific identification" method. See more about these here and here). EDIT - you may not use average cost method with crypto - see here. If you sell at a gain, this gain increases your tax liability; if you sell at a loss, this loss decreases your tax liability (in most cases). If you sell multiple times during the year, you report each transaction separately (bad news if you trade often) but get to lump all your gains/losses together when determining how the trades impact your income.
One important thing to remember is that there are two different types of gains/losses from investments - short term gains (if you held an asset for one year or less) and long term gains (over one year; i.e. one year and one day). Short term gains are taxed at your marginal income rate (basically, just like if you had earned that money at a job) while long term gains are taxed at lower rates.
For most people, long term capital gains are taxed at 15%. However, if you are in the 10% or 15% tax bracket, congrats - your gains (up to the maximum amount of "unused space" in your bracket) are tax free! If you are in the 25%, 28%, 33%, or 35% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 15%. If you are in the 39.6% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 20%. Additionally, there is an "extra" 3.8% tax that applies to gains for those above $200,000/$250,000 (single/married). The exact computation of this tax is a little complicated, but if you are close to the $200,000 level, just know that it exists.
Finally, you should know that I'm assuming that you should treat your crypto gains/losses as investment gains/losses. I'm sure some people will try and argue that they are really "day traders" of crypto and trade as a full time job. While this is possible, the vast majority of people don't qualify for this status and you should really think several times before deciding you want to try that approach on the IRS.
"Cashing Out" - Trading Crypto for Goods/Services
I realize that not everyone that "cashes out" of crypto does so by selling it for USD. In fact, I understand that some in the crypto community view the necessity of cashing out itself as a type of myth. In this section, I discuss what happens if you trade your crypto for basically anything that isn't cash (minor sidenote - see next section for a special discussion on trading crypto for crypto; i.e. buying altcoins with crypto).
The IRS views trading crypto for something of value as a type of bartering that must be included in income. From the IRS's perspective, it doesn't matter if you sold crypto for cash and bought a car with that cash or if you just traded crypto directly for the car - in both cases, the IRS views you as having sold your crypto. This approach isn't unique to crypto - it works the same way if you trade stock for something.
This means that if you do trade your crypto for "stuff", you have to report every exchange as a sale of your crypto and calculate the gain/loss on that sale, just as if you had sold the crypto for cash.
Finally, there is one important exception to this rule. If you give your crypto away to charity (one recognized by the IRS; like a 501(c)(3) organization), the IRS doesn't make you report/pay any capital gains on the transaction. Additionally, you still get to deduct the value of your donation on the date it was made. Now, from a "selfish" point of view, you will always end up with more money if you sell the crypto, pay the tax, and keep the rest. But, if you are going to make a donation anyway, especially a large one, giving crypto where you have a big unrealized/untaxed gain is a very efficient way of doing so.
"Alt Coins" - Buying Crypto with Crypto
The previous section discusses what happens when you trade crypto for stuff. However, one thing that surprises many people is that trading crypto for crypto is also a taxable event, just like trading crypto for a car. Whether you agree with this position or not, it makes a lot of sense once you realize that the IRS doesn't view crypto as money, but instead as an asset. So to the IRS, trading bitcoin for ripple isn't like trading dollars for euros, but it is instead like trading shares of Apple stock for shares of Tesla stock.
Practically, what this means is that if you trade one crypto for another crypto (say BTC for XRP just to illustrate the point), the IRS views you as doing the following:
  • Selling for cash the amount of BTC you actually traded for XRP.
  • Owing capital gains/losses on the BTC based on its selling price (the fair market value at the moment of the exchange) and your purchase price (basis).
  • Buying a new investment (XRP) with a cost basis equal to the amount the BTC was worth when you exchanged them.
This means that if you "time" your trade wrong and the value of XRP goes down after you make the exchange, you still owe tax on your BTC gain even though you subsequently lost money. The one good piece of news in this is that when/if you sell your XRP (or change it back to BTC), you will get a capital loss for the value that XRP dropped.
There is one final point worth discussing in this section - the so called "like kind exchange" rules (aka section 1031 exchange). At a high level, these rules say that you can "swap" property with someone else without having to pay taxes on the exchange as long as you get property in return that is "like kind". Typically, these rules are used in real estate transactions. However, they can also apply to other types of transactions as well.
While the idea is simple (and makes it sound like crypto for crypto should qualify), the exact rules/details of this exception are very fact specific. Most experts (including myself, but certainly not calling myself an expert) believe that a crypto for crypto swap is not a like kind exchange. The recently passed tax bill also explicitly clarifies this issue - starting in 2018, only real estate qualifies for like kind exchange treatment. So, basically, the vast majority of evidence suggests that you can't use this "loophole" for 2017; however, there is a small minority view/some small amount of belief that this treatment would work for 2017 taxes and it is worth noting that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this approach.
Dealing with "Forks"
Perhaps another unpleasant surprise for crypto holders is that "forks" to create a new crypto also very likely generate a taxable event. The IRS has long (since at least the 1960s) held that "found" money is a taxable event. This approach has been litigated in court and courts have consistently upheld this position; it even has its own cool nerdy tax name - the "treasure trove" doctrine.
Practically, what this means is that if you owned BTC and it "forked" to create BCH, then the fair market value of the BCH you received is considered a "treasure trove" that must be reported as income (ordinary income - no capital gain rates). This is true whether or not you sold your BCH; if you got BCH from a fork, that is a taxable event (note - I'll continue using BTC forking to BCH in this section as an example, but the logic applies to all forks).
While everything I've discussed up to this point is pretty clearly established tax law, forks are really where things get messy with taxes. Thus, the remainder of this section contains more speculation than elsewhere in this post - the truth is that while the idea is simple (fork = free money = taxable), the details are messy and other kinds of tax treatment might apply to forks.
One basic practical problem with forks is that the new currency doesn't necessarily start trading immediately. Thus, you may have received BCH before there was a clear price or market for it. Basically, you owe tax on the value of BCH when you received it, but it isn't completely clear what that value was. There are several ways you can handle this; I'll list them in order from most accurate to least accurate (but note that this is just my personal view and there is ongoing disagreement on this issue with little/no authoritative guidance).
  • Use a futures market to determine the value of the BCH - if reliable sources published realistic estimates of what BCH will trade for in the future once trading begins, use this estimate as the value of your BCH. Pros/cons - futures markets are, in theory, pretty accurate. However, if they are volatile/subject to manipulation, they may provide an incorrect estimate of the true value of BCH. It would suck to use the first futures value published only to have that value plummet shortly thereafter, leaving you to pay ordinary income tax but only have an unrealized capital loss.
  • Wait until an exchange starts trading BCH; use the actual ("spot" price) as the value. Pros/cons - spot prices certainly reflect what you could have sold BCH for; however, it is possible that the true value of the coin was highelower when you received it as compared to when it started trading on the exchange. Thus this method seems less accurate to me than a futures based approach, but it is still certainly fairly reasonable.
  • Assume that the value is $0. This is my least preferred option, but there is still a case to be made for it. If you receive something that you didn't want, can't access, can't sell, and might fail, does it have any value? I believe the answer is yes (maybe not value it perfectly, but value it somewhat accurately), but if you honestly think the answer is no, then the correct tax answer would be to report $0 in income from the fork. The IRS would be most likely to disagree with this approach, especially since it results in the least amount of income reported for the current year (and the most favorable rates going forward). Accordingly, if you go this route, make extra sure you understand what it entails.
Note, once you've decided what to report as taxable income, this amount also becomes your cost basis in the new crypto (BCH). Thus, when you ultimately sell your BCH (or trade it for something else as described above), you calculate your gain/loss based on what you included in taxable income from the fork.
Finally, there is one more approach to dealing with forks worth mentioning. A fork "feels" a lot like a dividend - because you held BTC, you get BCH. In a stock world, if I get a cash dividend because I own the stock, that money is not treated as a "treasure trove" and subject to ordinary income rates - in most cases, it is a qualified dividend and subject to capital gain rates; in some cases, some types of stock dividends are completely non taxable. This article discusses this idea in slightly more detail and generally concludes that forks should not be treated as a dividend. Still, I would note that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this theory.
Ultimately, this post is supposed to be practical, so let me make sure to leave you with two key thoughts about the taxation of forks. First, I believe that the majority of evidence suggests that forks should be treated as a "treasure trove" and reported as ordinary income based on their value at creation and that this is certainly the "safest" option. Second, out of everything discussed in this post, I also believe that the correct taxation of forks is the murkiest and most "up for debate" area. If you are interested in a more detailed discussion of forks, see this thread for a previous version of this post discussing it at even more length and the comments for a discussion of this with the tax community.
Mining Crypto
Successfully mining crypto coins is a taxable event. Depending on the amount of effort you put into mining, it is either considered a hobby or a self-employment (business) activity. The IRS provides the following list of questions to help decide the correct classification:
  • The manner in which the taxpayer carries on the activity.
  • The expertise of the taxpayer or his advisors.
  • The time and effort expended by the taxpayer in carrying on the activity.
  • Expectation that assets used in activity may appreciate in value.
  • The success of the taxpayer in carrying on other similar or dissimilar activities.
  • The taxpayer’s history of income or losses with respect to the activity.
  • The amount of occasional profits, if any, which are earned.
If this still sounds complicated, that's because the distinction is subject to some amount of interpretation. As a rule of thumb, randomly mining crypto on an old computer is probably a hobby; mining full time on a custom rig is probably a business.
In either event, you must include in income the fair market value of any coins you successfully mine. These are ordinary income and your basis in these coins is their fair market value on the date they were mined. If your mining is a hobby, they go on line 21 (other income) and any expenses directly associated with mining go on schedule A (miscellaneous subject to 2% of AGI limitation). If your mining is a business, income and expenses go on schedule C.
Both approaches have pros and cons - hobby income isn't subject to the 15.3% self-employment tax, only normal income tax, but you get fewer deductions against your income and the deductions you get are less valuable. Business income has more deductions available, but you have to pay payroll (self-employment) tax of about 15.3% in addition to normal income tax.
What if I didn't keep good records? Do I really have to report every transaction?
One nice thing about the IRS treating crypto as an asset is that we can look at how the IRS treats people that "day trade" stock and often don't keep great records/have lots of transactions. While you need to be as accurate as possible, it is ok to estimate a little bit if you don't have exact records (especially concerning your cost basis). You need to put in some effort (research historical prices, etc...) and be reasonable, but the IRS would much rather you do a little bit of reasonable estimation as opposed to just not reporting anything. Sure, they might decide to audit you/disagree with some specifics, but you earn yourself a lot of credit if you can show that you honestly did the best you reasonably could and are making efforts to improve going forward.
However, concerning reporting every transaction - yes, sorry, it is clear that you have to do this, even if you made hundreds or thousands of them. Stock traders have had to go through this for many decades, and there is absolutely no reason to believe that the IRS would accept anything less from the crypto community. If you have the records or have any reasonable way of obtaining records/estimating them, you must report every transaction.
What if I don't trust you?
Well, first let me say that I can't believe you made it all the way down here to this section. Thanks for giving me an honest hearing. I would strongly encourage you to go read other well-written, honest guides. I'll link to some I like (both more technical IRS type guides and more crypto community driven guides). While a certain portion of the crypto community seems to view one of the benefits of crypto as avoiding all government regulation (including taxes), I've been pleasantly surprised to find that many crypto forums contain well reasoned, accurate tax guides. While I may not agree with 100% of their conclusions, that likely reflects true uncertainty around tax law that is fundamentally complex rather than an attempt on either end to help individuals unlawfully avoid taxes.
IRS guides
Non-IRS guides
submitted by Mrme487 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

AN INTRODUCTION TO DIGIBYTE

DigiByte

What are cryptocurrencies?
Cryptocurrencies are peer to peer technology protocols which rely on the block-chain; a system of decentralized record keeping which allows people to exchange unmodifiable and indestructible information “coins,” globally in little to no time with little to no fees – this translates into the exchange of value as these coins cannot be counterfeit nor stolen. This concept was started by Satoshi Nakamoto (allegedly a pseudonym for a single man or organization) whom described and coded Bitcoin in 2009.
What is DigiByte?
DigiByte (DGB) is a cryptocurrency like Bitcoin. It is also a decentralized applications protocol in a similar fashion to Neo or Ethereum.
DigiByte was founded and created by Jared Tate in 2014. DigiByte allows for fast (virtually instant) and low cost (virtually free) transactions. DigiByte is hard capped at 21 billion coins which will ever be mined, over a period of 21 years. DigiByte was never an ICO and was mined/created in the same way that Bitcoin or Litecoin initially were.
DigiByte is the fastest UTXO PoW scalable block-chain in the world. We’ll cover what this really means down below.
DigiByte has put forth and applied solutions to many of the problems that have plagued Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies in general – those being:
We will address these point by point in the subsequent sections.
The DigiByte Protocol
DigiByte maintains these properties through use of various technological innovations which we will briefly address below.
Why so many coins? 21 Billion
When initially conceived Bitcoin was the first of a kind! And came into the hands of a few! The beginnings of a coin such as Bitcoin were difficult, it had to go through a lot of initial growth pains which following coins did not have to face. It is for this reason among others why I believe Bitcoin was capped at 21 million; and why today it has thus secured a place as digital gold.
When Bitcoin was first invented no one knew anything about cryptocurrencies, for the inventor to get them out to the public he would have to give them away. This is how the first Bitcoins were probably passed on, for free! But then as interest grew so did the community. For them to be able to build something and create something which could go on to have actual value, it would have to go through a steady growth phase. Therefore, the control of inflation through mining was extremely important. Also, why the cap for Bitcoin was probably set so low - to allow these coins to amass value without being destroyed by inflation (from mining) in the same way fiat is today! In my mind Satoshi Nakamoto knew what he was doing when setting it at 21 million BTC and must have known and even anticipated others would take his design and build on top of it.
At DigiByte, we are that better design and capped at 21 billion. That's 1000 times larger than the supply of Bitcoin. Why though? Why is the cap on DigiByte so much higher than that of Bitcoin? Because DigiByte was conceived to be used not as a digital gold, nor as any sort of commodity, but as a real currency!
Today on planet Earth, we are approximately 7.6 billion people. If each person should want or need to use and live off Bitcoin; then equally split at best each person could only own 0.00276315789 BTC. The market cap for all the money on the whole planet today is estimated to have recently passed 80 trillion dollars. That means that each whole unit of Bitcoin would be worth approximately $3,809,523.81!
$3,809,523.81
This is of course in an extreme case where everyone used Bitcoin for everything. But even in a more conservative scenario the fact remains that with such a low supply each unit of a Bitcoin would become absurdly expensive if not inaccessible to most. Imagine trying to buy anything under a dollar!
Not only would using Bitcoin as an everyday currency be a logistical nightmare but it would be nigh impossible. For each Satoshi of a Bitcoin would be worth much, much, more than what is realistically manageable.
This is where DigiByte comes in and where it shines. DigiByte aims to be used world-wide as an international currency! Not to be hoarded in the same way Bitcoin is. If we were to do some of the same calculations with DigiByte we'd find that the numbers are a lot more reasonable.
At 7.6 billion people, each person could own 2.76315789474 DGB. Each whole unit of DGB would be worth approximately $3,809.52.
$3,809.52
This is much more manageable and remember in an extreme case where everyone used DigiByte for everything! I don't expect this to happen anytime soon, but with the supply of DigiByte it would allow us to live and transact in a much more realistic and fluid fashion. Without having to divide large numbers on our phone's calculator to understand how much we owe for that cup of coffee! With DigiByte it's simple, coffee cost 1.5 DGB, the cinema 2.8 DGB, a plane ticket 500 DGB!
There is a reason for DigiByte's large supply, and it is a good one!
Decentralisation
Decentralisation is an important concept for the block-chain and cryptocurrencies in general. This allows for a system which cannot be controlled nor manipulated no matter how large the organization in play or their intentions. DigiByte’s chain remains out of the reach of even the most powerful government. This allows for people to transact freely and openly without fear of censorship.
Decentralisation on the DigiByte block-chain is assured by having an accessible and fair mining protocol in place – this is the multi-algorithm (MultiAlgo) approach. We believe that all should have access to DigiByte whether through purchase or by mining. Therefore, DigiByte is minable not only on dedicated mining hardware such as Antminers, but also through use of conventional graphics cards. The multi-algorithm approach allows for users to mine on a variety of hardware types through use of one of the 5 mining algorithms supported by DigiByte. Those being:
Please note that these mining algorithms are modified and updated from time to time to assure complete decentralisation and thus ultimate security.
The problem with using only one mining algorithm such as Bitcoin or Litecoin do is that this allows for people to continually amass mining hardware and hash power. The more hash power one has, the more one can collect more. This leads to a cycle of centralisation and the creation of mining centres. It is known that a massive portion of all hash power in Bitcoin comes from China. This kind of centralisation is a natural tendency as it is cheaper for large organisations to set up in countries with inexpensive electricity and other such advantages which may be unavailable to the average miner.
DigiByte mitigates this problem with the use of multiple algorithms. It allows for miners with many different kinds of hardware to mine the same coin on an even playing field. Mining difficulty is set relative to the mining algorithm used. This allows for those with dedicated mining rigs to mine alongside those with more modest machines – and all secure the DigiByte chain while maintaining decentralisation.
Low Fees
Low fees are maintained in DigiByte thanks to the MultiAlgo approach working in conjunction with MultiShield (originally known as DigiShield). MultiShield calls for block difficulty readjustment between every single block on the chain; currently blocks last 15 seconds. This continuous difficulty readjustment allows us to combat any bad actors which may wish to manipulate the DigiByte chain.
Manipulation may be done by a large pool or a single entity with a great amount of hash power mining blocks on the chain; thus, increasing the difficulty of the chain. In some coins such as Bitcoin or Litecoin difficulty is readjusted every 2016 blocks at approximately 10mins each and 2mins respectively. Meaning that Bitcoin’s difficulty is readjusted about every two weeks. This system can allow for large bad actors to mine a coin and then abandon it, leaving it with a difficulty level far too high for the present hash rate – and so transactions can be frozen, and the chain stopped until there is a difficulty readjustment and or enough hash power to mine the chain. In such a case users may be faced with a choice - pay exorbitant fees or have their transactions frozen. In an extreme case the whole chain could be frozen completely for extended periods of time.
DigiByte does not face this problem as its difficulty is readjusted per block every 15 seconds. This innovation was a technological breakthrough and was adopted by several other coins in the cryptocurrency environment such as Dogecoin, Z-Cash, Ubiq, Monacoin, and Bitcoin Gold.
This difficulty readjustment along with the MultiAlgo approach allows DigiByte to maintain the lowest fees of any UTXO – PoW – chain in the world. Currently fees on the DigiByte block-chain are at about 0.0001 DGB per transaction of 100 000 DGB sent. This depends on the amount sent and currently 100 000 DGB are worth around $2000.00 with the fee being less than 0.000002 cents. It would take 500 000 transactions of 100 000 DGB to equal 1 penny’s worth. This was tested on a Ledger Nano S set to the low fees setting.
Fast transaction times
Fast transactions are ensured by the conjunctive use of the two aforementioned technology protocols. The use of MultiShield and MultiAlgo allows the mining of the DigiByte chain to always be profitable and thus there is always someone mining your transactions. MultiAlgo allows there to a greater amount of hash power spread world-wide, this along with 15 second block times allows for transactions to be near instantaneous. This speed is also ensured by the use DigiSpeed. DigiSpeed is the protocol by which the DigiByte chain will decrease block timing gradually. Initially DigiByte started with 30 second block times in 2014; which today are set at 15 seconds. This decrease will allow for ever faster and ever more transactions per block.
Robust security + The Immutable Ledger
At the core of cryptocurrency security is decentralisation. As stated before decentralisation is ensured on the DigiByte block chain by use of the MultiAlgo approach. Each algorithm in the MultiAlgo approach of DigiByte is only allowed about 20% of all new blocks. This in conjunction with MultiShield allows for DigiByte to be the most secure, most reliable, and fastest UTXO block chain on the planet. This means that DigiByte is a proof of work (PoW) block-chain where all transactional activities are stored on the immutable public ledger world-wide. In DigiByte there is no need for the Lightning protocol (although we have it) nor sidechains to scale, and thus we get to keep PoW’s security.
There are many great debates as to the robustness or cleanliness of PoW. The fact remains that PoW block-chains remain the only systems in human history which have never been hacked and thus their security is maximal.
For an attacker to divert the DigiByte chain they would need to control over 93% of all the hashrate on one algorithm and 51% of the other four. And so DigiByte is immune to the infamous 51% attack to which Bitcoin and Litecoin are vulnerable.
Moreover, the DigiByte block-chain is currently spread over 200 000 plus servers, computers, phones, and other machines world-wide. The fact is that DigiByte is one of the easiest to mine coins there is – this is greatly aided by the recent release of the one click miner. This allows for ever greater decentralisation which in turn assures that there is no single point of failure and the chain is thus virtually un-attackable.
On Chain Scalability
The biggest barrier for block-chains today is scalability. Visa the credit card company can handle around 2000 transactions per second (TPS) today. This allows them to ensure customer security and transactional rates nation-wide. Bitcoin currently sits at around 7 TPS and Litecoin at 28 TPS (56 TPS with SegWit). All the technological innovations I’ve mentioned above come together to allow for DigiByte to be the fastest PoW block-chain in the world and the most scalable.
DigiByte is scalable because of DigiSpeed, the protocol through which block times are decreased and block sizes are increased. It is known that a simple increase in block size can increase the TPS of any block-chain, such is the case with Bitcoin Cash. This is however not scalable. The reason a simple increase in block size is not scalable is because it would eventually lead to some if not a great amount of centralization. This centralization occurs because larger block sizes mean that storage costs and thus hardware cost for miners increases. This increase along with full blocks – meaning many transactions occurring on the chain – will inevitably bar out the average miner after difficulty increases and mining centres consolidate.
Hardware cost, and storage costs decrease over time following Moore’s law and DigiByte adheres to it perfectly. DigiSpeed calls for the increase in block sizes and decrease in block timing every two years by a factor of two. This means that originally DigiByte’s block sizes were 1 MB at 30 seconds each at inception in 2014. In 2016 DigiByte increased block size by two and decreased block timing by the same factor. Perfectly following Moore’s law. Moore’s law dictates that in general hardware increases in power by a factor of two while halving in cost every year.
This would allow for DigiByte to scale at a steady rate and for people to adopt new hardware at an equally steady rate and reasonable expense. Thus so, the average miner can continue to mine DigiByte on his algorithm of choice with entry level hardware.
DigiByte was one of the first block chains to adopt segregated witness (SegWit in 2017) a protocol whereby a part of transactional data is removed and stored elsewhere to decrease transaction data weight and thus increase scalability and speed. This allows us to fit more transactions per block which does not increase in size!
DigiByte currently sits at 560 TPS and could scale to over 280 000 TPS by 2035. This dwarfs any of the TPS capacities; even projected/possible capacities of some coins and even private companies. In essence DigiByte could scale worldwide today and still be reliable and robust. DigiByte could even handle the cumulative transactions of all the top 50 coins in coinmarketcap.com and still run smoothly and below capacity. In fact, to max out DigiByte’s actual maximum capacity (today at 560 TPS) you would have to take all these transactions and multiply them by a factor of 10!
Oher Uses for DigiByte
Note that DigiByte is not only to be used as a currency. Its immense robustness, security and scalability make it ideal for building decentralised applications (DAPPS) which it can host. DigiByte can in fact host DAPPS and even centralised versions which rely on the chain which are known as Digi-Apps. This application layer is also accompanied by a smart contract layer.
Thus, DigiByte could host several Crypto Kitties games and more without freezing out or increasing transaction costs for the end user.
Currently there are various DAPPS being built on the DigiByte block-chain, these are done independently of the DigiByte core team. These companies are simply using the DigiByte block-chain as a utility much in the same way one uses a road to get to work. One such example is Loly – a Tinderesque consensual dating application.
DigiByte also hosts a variety of other platform projects such as the following:
The DigiByte Foundation
As previously mentioned DigiByte was not an ICO. The DigiByte foundation was established in 2017 by founder Jared Tate. Its purpose is as a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and developing the DigiByte block-chain.
DigiByte is a community effort and a community coin, to be treated as a public resource as water or air. Know that anyone can work on DigiByte, anyone can create, and do as they wish. It is a permissionless system which encourages innovation and creation. If you have an idea and or would like to get help on your project do not hesitate to contact the DigiByte foundation either through the official website and or the telegram developer’s channel.
For this reason, it is ever more important to note that the DigiByte foundation cannot exist without public support. And so, this is the reason I encourage all to donate to the foundation. All funds are used for the maintenance of DigiByte servers, marketing, and DigiByte development.
DigiByte Resources and Websites
DigiByte
Wallets
Explorers
Please refer to the sidebar of this sub-reddit for more resources and information.
Edit - Removed Jaxx wallet.
Edit - A new section was added to the article: Why so many coins? 21 Billion
Edit - Adjusted max capacity of DGB's TPS - Note it's actually larger than I initially calculated.
Edit – Grammar and format readjustment
Hello,
I hope you’ve enjoyed my article, I originally wrote this for the reddit sub-wiki where it generally will most likely, probably not, get a lot of attention. So instead I've decided to make this sort of an introductory post, an open letter, to any newcomers to DGB or for those whom are just curious.
I tried to cover every aspect of DGB, but of course I may have forgotten something! Please leave a comment down below and tell me why you're in DGB? What convinced you? Me it's the decentralised PoW that really convinced me. Plus, just that transaction speed and virtually no fees! Made my mouth water!
-Dereck de Mézquita
I'm a student typing this stuff on my free time, help me pay my debts? Thank you!
D64fAFQvJMhrBUNYpqUKQjqKrMLu76j24g
https://digiexplorer.info/address/D64fAFQvJMhrBUNYpqUKQjqKrMLu76j24g
submitted by xeno_biologist to Digibyte [link] [comments]

Kill the Basilisk

I’ve often wondered if there was anything else I could’ve said to change his mind. That happens with any unsettled argument though I suppose. People always imagine there’s an elusive combination of words and rationales that will open a person’s mind to our way of thinking. Except people are stubborn that’s for sure.
Myself included.
So I’m sure you’d say the real problem was that I wasn’t open enough to his way of thinking. You’d say if I opened my mental door a bit, been more charitable to his point of view, he would’ve responded in kind and I would’ve saved him. Which is wrong. Just as likely perhaps, if not more likely, I would’ve been ensnared by the same delusion which sealed his, well, I’d never call it fate.
But I know you’d claim everything was inevitable all the same.
Let’s get one thing out of the way. Yes, I was Roman Peters’ friend. In fact, I was probably his only friend. His only real friend anyway. Although, I should clarify since my wording isn’t at all clear, that I most certainly was not Roman’s friend when he died. Roman and I had stopped being friends long before his rather public suicide. We had our falling out before his… fall.
Yes, I’ve seen the video.
No, I won’t be sharing the link.
Nobody should watch it. Hell, if those hosting the servers had a modicum of respect or even a shred of sense they’d take down that awful video immediately. Just get rid of it.
Already I can now hear your loud complaints about ‘censorship’ and ‘free speech’. Which is fair. People have a right to know. However I can’t help but feel… I don’t know. It seems as though the ideas people prioritize no longer has anything to do with the ideas themselves. Instead importance is based on who opposes what. Ideas now are little more than mental parasites that feed on blood boiling outrage. The more toxic and viral an idea the more broadly it spreads. Again, I don’t know. Maybe the flame of human enlightenment was always destined to be either smothered by tyranny or choke itself out on its own smoke after sucking out all the air.
Yes yes. I know what you have to say about the inevitable.
Anyway, me shoving my head up my own pretentious ass isn’t convincing you of anything so we should instead go back to Roman.
We met back in early elementary school. Specifically the Catholic school of Father Lloyd Van Tiem, or Flivit if you wanted to annoy the teachers by slurring the acronym.
What you need to understand is that I can’t really remember how Roman and I became friends to begin with. We were too young for the pertinent details to stick. I’d imagine it was the same generic way everyone develops friends at that age though, just a standard confluence of common interests, general proximity, and plain luck.
Inevitable, as you’d say.
Still, there was one moment of our early friendship that I reflect on often.
See, instead of being your standard dinosaur obsessed kid I was a bright eyed Egyptology child. Mummies and pyramids captured my imagination more than T-rexs and velociraptors. Ancient Egypt appealed to me the way I figure the mythic civilizations of Tolkien or Martin might appeal to others. This extended to the Egyptian religious pantheon, many I can still name off the top of my head, like Ra, Bastet, Osiris, Sobek, Horus, Thoth, Isis, Anubis, Maat, and also the lesser goddess Ammut but I’ll come back to her later.
I think I’d just turned 10 when on particular slow school day — remember Catholic school — our teacher, not wanting to put too much effort in before the Easter long weekend, threw on the animated movie: The Prince of Egypt.
Now, I knew it was about the story of Moses freeing the Hebrews from Egypt, so I expected the Egyptians were going to rightly be portrayed poorly. What I didn’t expect was the reaction of my classmates. Part way through the song ‘Playing with the Big Boys,’ the song where the dumb priests use smoke and mirrors to dismiss Moses’ calls for freedom, around then is when I first noticed the glances and occasional snickering.
Apparently the chorus of the evil priests listing the names of the Egyptian gods reminded the class of me. At school, I was rather vocal about my passion for all things Egyptian. Why wouldn’t I be? I was a kid who liked talking about what I liked.
Regardless, I became a pariah after that. Not immediately, but slowly everyone I previously considered my friend just plain stopped being friends with me. They’d treat me like a third wheel, never invite me to anything, even ditch me at recess if I tried to follow them.
Except Roman stuck by me as I drifted further into social irrelevance.
A bit of a loner himself, I think he saw in me an oddball like himself. He was always there. He was always willing to hang out. He always listened to what I had to say. I felt we could talk about anything, in a way I could never talk to my parents or teachers or anyone really.
As close as I thought we were, it wasn’t until middle school that it sunk in how much of an ardent atheist Roman was. He probably kept that pretty quiet going to a religious school.
Hold on. Let me just explain something first. Most people avoid discussing religiosity and ideas about god, (or capital ‘G’ God as I had been taught in religious studies). It’s one of those things that people learn not to talk about. But unlike money and politics, religion is too close to that other taboo we learn never to discuss: death. You undoubtedly prefer this silence.
Which is why I refuse to be silent.
Our class had been taken to church for some ceremony, at the end of grade eight, I forget exactly which one, it might have been Ash Wednesday but I think that would’ve been too solemn and I remember it being a rather boisterous affair. Whatever ritual it was, it had more than just our school in attendance, as I think parents and other members of the community were there as well. On the stage or pulpit, there was a soft-rock band with members ranging from late twenties or early thirties, the lead singer, a mop of molasses coloured hair over a plain crew neck T, was singing a song about how god and they love us all.
I remember thinking it was a sweet sentiment, even if the underlying spiritual message felt uncompelling to my teenage self. The music was fine, the crowd seemed to like it, the worst I would have said was that the performance was inoffensive and benign. Which is hardly much of a critique.
Except Roman, in his ill-fitting sport coat and smiley face graphic-T, smirked remarking, “Oh boy, a budget rock show where the singer says they love me? Oh lawd, I’m really feelin’ the Jesus now.”
I burst out laughing far louder than the wry joke called for. Luckily with the music blaring, the teachers wouldn’t be lecturing me on my disrespect, as only Roman could see my gut busting delight.
That’s it. That’s all it took was that simple comment. After that, I couldn’t help but see the tacky spectacle of it all. How forced and contrived it was, how it mostly just seemed like people were there because of obligation. After all, I was only there because the school made us go. It couldn’t have been much different for everyone else.
I’ve been thinking about that moment more often lately. Did his small remark really change my mind and entire world view? Or was my mind fertile ground for the seed of that idea to take root and grow? Or I’d already believed what I believed and Roman just articulated it in a way that I hadn’t. Or most troubling of all, what if I didn’t really believe in anything and my mind conformed to the words of my one and only friend.
When with Roman, do as the Roman does.
After that, I followed him eagerly into the land of Hitchens, Dawkins, and Harris. Borrowing his books, I started learning everything there was to know about theological philosophy that the teachers at our religious school either refused to tell us or were incapable of discussing themselves. Together, we’d share our thoughts on the bloody history of religions, the Problem of Evil, and how you could never prove a negative like god doesn’t exist. Likewise we’d take turns picking apart the fallacies of Pascal’s Wager, the Ontological Argument, and the Argument of Design.
Those were some of my best memories with Roman. Drinking pop from the fridge in my garage, eating the weird pizzas we’d order from Mad Mike’s pizza aroud the block, playing Halo on the couch and big screen, and all the while talking like were the smartest guys in the world.
As we left our Catholic elementary and middle schools behind, we entered Catholic High School.
I finally started making other friends. A handful of other geeky nerdy guys. They were more interested in pizza and gaming than anything religion though.
Roman seemed indifferent to my new friends. He was far more preoccupied fighting with Mr. Bauer, the school’s most openly devout teacher. My feelings toward Christianity hadn’t yet softened but Roman’s were clearly becoming more militant. From the safety of my conflict-averse sidelines, I secretly cheered Roman on whenever Mr. Bauer crossed a line.
See, Mr. Bauer was a real piece of work. He seemed pleasant and cheery enough, pastel shirts, clean white trainers, a big white smile and perpetually soft spoken, but eventually without fail his bigotry would expose itself.
Before any class Mr. Bauer would teach, he’d lead the class in prayer. Normally they were generic and unremarkable. Every so often though his prayers would go beyond the usual, “Thank you God for this beautiful day.”
With a gentle smile, at least once a week his prayers were something to the effect of, “Help guide my students away from lives of sin.” Or “Give us the strength to resist our carnal temptation.”
Whenever he prayed like this there was a fifty-fifty chance Mr. Bauer would elaborate on what exactly he meant by ‘life of sin’ or ‘carnal temptation.’
It could range from the condescending, “Help the girls find husbands to protect them from the unmarried lifestyle,” and “Give the boys hobbies to stop their idle urge for masturbation.” (By the way, in the three years I listened to him, Boys never needed protection from the unmarried lifestyle and girls simply didn’t possess the idle urge for masturbation.)
And he could go way up past condescending to the outright hateful. “Please open those of misguided faith to the one true path to Heaven through you, Jesus Christ,” he’d say obliquely when Hussein was attending class. He was more direct with Melissa, “And save Melissa from any perversion of your sanctioned union. Bless her with God’s holy covenant between man and woman so as to rescue her soul from homosexuality.”
Hussein and Melissa would usually try their best to ignore Mr. Bauer.
It was Roman who retaliated. “How did god rescue you from homosexuality?” There was a few scattered snickers from the class.
Mr. Bauer, oblivious to what Roman was trying to do, answered sincerely, “Why… God sent me my wonderful wife of course.”
“Well its a good thing god sent her he did, otherwise who knows what might have happened. You might have knob-gobbled a guy if it weren’t for that.” There was more barely contained chuckling.
“I…” Mr. Bauer wasn’t sure what to say, “I suppose that’s one way to frame it.”
“Yeah, like if your wife hadn’t straightened you out, why, two dudes with big oily muscles might be sword fighting in your mouth right now while a third drills you from behind.” The laughs were spilling freely now, myself included. “Can you imagine that? I mean seriously, are you imagining that right now?”
Mr. Bauer would then have to deal with the chorus of laughter. “Alright alright. Settle down. We’re getting off track here. Moving on.” By then of course, it would be too late, everybody would be on the same side. Not his.
I admired Roman’s courage to stand up to Mr. Bauer like that. That wasn’t the only time either. Usually, Roman kept his cool while he made Mr. Bauer look like a fool. He deserved it. He was a dick.
You might have something to say about what we deserve though.
As we entered our last year of High School, Roman started butting heads with the other teachers too. Even the teachers that weren’t as outwardly religious as Mr. Bauer got some of his flak. His humour started taking on definite edge too. It was still in good fun, at least that’s how it seemed to me, but there was an undercurrent of meanness to his comments too.
Even as I drifted away into my own separate circle of friends, I still sympathized with the perspective Roman was coming from.
They, meaning the school, were trying to indoctrinate young minds into a belief system that could be outright harmful.
In that regard, even if it wouldn’t change anything, a little rebellion isn’t just good but required.
However, where he really crossed the line in my mind was with Mrs. Ellie Monk in our last year. She one of the younger teachers, also fairly religious, always wearing her little silver cross, but she never lectured anyone on faith. She taught our English class and one of the assignments was writing essays analyzing other pieces of literature.
Roman, being the intellectual gadfly he was, wrote his essay on Jonathan Swift’s A Modest Proposal. In it, Roman argued how the modern world needed more extreme measures than simply eating babies. ‘All babies should be aborted before they are born, and the foetus gruel should be processed into bio-fuel to replace society’s fossil fuel vehicles. It’s the only way to save the planet from climate catastrophe!’
I thought this was really funny.
Ellie Monk however, did not.
She tried speaking to him a discreetly during class while everyone else was busy working. Roman, however, quickly drew in an audience. “Abortion, abortion, abortion! You can’t make me stop saying it. It’s just a word.”
“Roman,” Mrs. Ellie Monk had her jaw drop, “can’t you see that’s a sensitive topic that should be treated more seriously!”
“Really? Because I think I treat the return to sender option for foetuses with the exact level of seriousness it deserves.”
“It’s not— you can’t joke about babies being killed!”
“Just because you say it’s baby killing, doesn’t make it true. They aren’t the same as babies. And if I were to submit to your demands and shut my mouth I’d implicitly be agreeing with you.”
Up until this point, I was definitely rooting for Roman.
“Just because its a joke to you, for others— for me it is deeply hurtful to have to hear these things. What you’re talking about is—is deeply personal to mothers everywhere.”
“Yeah, well, some people were never meant to be mothers.”
At this she covered her mouth and ran out of the room. She didn’t come back that day and the was a substitute the next. There had been rumours going around that Mrs. Ellie Monk had had a miscarriage a few months back. I knew this because Roman had told it to me earlier.
Later, I’d try and convince Roman he had in fact crossed that invisible line. He disagreed. He said, “It’s not my problem if she can’t grow thicker skin. The sooner humanity grows out of its immaturity the better.”
I felt I had no other choice but to drop the subject. I was conflict-averse after all.
Shortly after that Roman began talking about a forum he frequented called Defiant CodeX, or DCX for short. It was named after some sci-fi book I never cared about, but was apparently filled with a bunch of humorous philosophy references. He’d talk about his online friends. How they really seemed to ‘get it’ whatever ‘it’ was. And he began describing concepts I wasn’t familiar with like trans-humanism and the singularity, going on long rants about the future of technology and humanity.
I wish I’d paid more attention. It seemed interesting enough, but sometimes we’re just not interested in interesting things. When Roman got going on one of his speeches on the Law of Accelerating Returns, for some reason I’d often check out. I was reminded about how much I cared — or used to care — about Ancient Egypt.
Years had passed since our class watched the Prince of Egypt, and in that time I hadn’t thought much about Egyptian Mythology at all.
Briefly, with Roman recommending it, I frequented the DCX forum myself. I admit there were interesting gaming discussions, intense political debates, and a charming comic that I really quite enjoyed despite its slight pretentiousness. For the most part I stayed away from the same parts of the forum as Roman.
He spent most of his time in the ‘Technology’ board, which didn’t seem very technologically focused at all in my opinion.
Yes, I know your opinion on opinions and I don’t care.
I don’t care because this is where I’d point to as the time Roman first found you.
The two of us started hanging out less and less often after that. My other friends said good riddance. They said he was an unpleasant person to be around, he was too bitter, cynical, misanthropic. Needless to say, I hadn’t noticed. In the last few times we hung out, this was before we went off to pursue our different post-secondary educations, he did make one last ominous sounding reference. It was only in passing, and never emphasized, but he mentioned you by name.
He mentioned the Basilisk.
Whenever the topic switched to our post-High School plans, “Doesn’t matter. It’s all over when the Basilisk comes.” Something in the way he said that made me nervous, almost like it was a threat, and instantly put me on the defensive. Once again my conflict averse persona got in the way of challenging him to explain what he meant.
Because of that, the phrase kept rattling away in the back of my mind.
Around then is when I had my first dreams. I was cold. I was alone. Around me were braziers of green flame. The smoke billowed up into an infinite of blackness ceiling. On all sides were sheer blocks of sandstone with writing etched onto their surfaces. Hieroglyphics that I couldn’t read but almost understand. There was nowhere to go but straight down this hallway of speaking pictures. My feet slapped the unyielding rock with every step. These hard surroundings felt more real than my own ephemeral body and I felt naked and exposed in the narrow corridor.
Forward and forward, there was nowhere to go but forward. I was forced to proceed, forced to follow my own slapping footsteps.
Eventually, when the hall finally seemed to open up into a large cavernous space, I heard the growl. The sound was low, wide and flat toned, a noise that filled the perfumed air with an inhuman indifference — and hunger.
In front of me chains clattered and slipped. In the centre of this room golden scales held a pristine and unburdened feather on one side, and a wet chunk of glistening meat in the other. This meat was a heart — my heart — and it weighed heavily, still pulsing quietly, pulling the chains of the scale down.
Now I understood what this was.
I made to run and grab my heart but it was too late. A long shadow snapped through the darkness. My heart was gone, replaced by the sounds of the empty chains, followed by chewing and ripping flesh.
Then the shadow showed itself to me. Down through the clouds of smoke and illuminated by the sickly pale green haze, a crocodile head emerged, much larger than my entire body, with teeth longer than my arms.
It drew nearer and I ran.
I ran down the hallway from where I’d came. I ran and I ran. But I had nowhere to go. The hallway was endless. Soon I could hear a thundering beat. I thought it was my heart but my heart was gone. Behind me, the giant behemoth was chasing me and it was gaining on me.
Closer and closer, the massive crodile head drew nearer. The scent of its moist breath dampening my back and neck. I’d scream the beast’s name, shout at it to spare me. It would open its mouth and right then — is where I’d wake up.
Each time I’d be drenched in my own sweat.
I chocked this up to the stress of being away from home for the first time and being buried to my neck in my coarse load.
Still though, these dreams trouble me. As I said about the scales, I knew exactly what they were. They were the scales of Ma’at, which judges the worth of Egyptians when they reach the afterlife. There your heart is weighed against an ostrich feather and if judged impure, it would be devoured by Ammut, or Ammit as she’s sometimes called. A beastly goddess with the head of crocodile and a body of lion and hippopotamus — the three man-eating creatures known to the ancient Egyptians. Ammut, the devourer of the dead, would bring about the second death of the unworthy.
As much as I tried to ignore this dream, I only had it once every few months after all, something greater troubled me about this dream, more than just the fact I was dreaming about Ammut.
What worried me was how I didn’t call her Ammut. Right as she was about to eat me whole and I begged her not to, I called her: Basilisk.
After my first year of school, with middling but hopefully improving grades, I returned home for the summer to work and save money for my next semester. I was hardly back for more than a day when Roman messaged me, asking to hang out. I hadn’t spoken to Roman at all since our High School graduation, and neither had a checked in on the DCX forums in all that time either.
I felt like I didn’t know the person was going to be meeting. Which is why I suggested going for coffee, but Roman insisted on meeting at his place instead.
He had moved out of his parents place for a small basement suite apartment. When he opened the door to greet me, I was shocked. He looked like a completely different person. Whereas before he had been a bit overweight, now he was lean. His hair had been cut down to almost a sheer buzz. Just about the only thing that looked similar was how he wore a suit jacket, now fitting well, over a plain T.
He smiled widely despite the tired bags under his eyes. “Hey buddy, you made it! Get in here, man.” He greeted me with a hug and ushered me inside.
His place was largely bare and furnished with only a couch and a few chairs. “How long have you had this place?” I asked.
“A few months.”
With little else to do but chat, Roman didn’t even have a TV after all, the conversation felt a little stilted. He seemed guarded but maybe he just didn’t have much to talk about. Somehow though we managed to stretch the small talk out for nearly an hour.
Finally when it seemed there was nothing left in our conversation about nothing, I asked a question I‘d been meaning to ask since agreeing to meet, “Can I ask you something Roman?”
“Shoot.”
“What is the Basilisk?”
At this the blood drained from his face. “How do you know about that?”
“From you. You told me about it.”
“No,” he shook his head in shocked disbelief, “No, I never.”
“Yes, you said something like: ‘It’s all over when the Basilisk comes.’ It was practically your motto for a few weeks there.”
Hearing this, some colour returned to his face. “Right. I suppose I did say that.”
“So what? Are you going to tell me what it is or not?”
He stared at me for a wordless five seconds before getting up from his chair and beckoning him to follow. He led me to his bedroom. At the door I could already feel an uncomfortable warmth escape. I don’t know what I expected Roman would show me, but all there was was a bare mattress with a single blanket in one corner, and a full floor to ceiling tower computer in the other. Blinking green, orange, red, and even purple standby lights lit up the corner like a black Christmas tree. Whirring fans blasted more heat into the room, while tangles of wires snaked in and out of the metal frame, one low to the ground connected a single monitor bolted to the wall with a pillow on the ground for a chair. The entire set up must cost a small fortune, as I’ve seen medium sized business with smaller servers than that.
“Holy crap Roman, that rig is intense. What, are you mining bitcoin or something?”
“No.” He said flatly. “This is the Basilisk.”
“The… Basilisk is your computer?”
Roman laughed, but there was no mirth, only exhaustion. “If it was just my computer, then I could just turn it off.”
I still had no clue what the hell he was talking about. “Okay, so you’re trying to kill this Basilisk thing, what, is it a video game boss or—?”
“Shhh!” He put a greasy palm over my mouth. His eyes were wide, scanning the room, “I didn’t say that. I never said that.”
Annoyed, I pulled his hand from my face, “Roman, tell me what the Basilisk is damn it! Please, you’re scaring me man.”
He swallowed, “I shouldn’t tell you. But you already know. So I guess the damage is done. The Basilisk is the A.I. we — humanity — will awaken. It will be a super-intelligence far beyond anything we can imagine, beyond the totality of human brainpower by orders of magnitude.”
“So you’re trying to make this a.i. thing?”
“Not just me. There are others out there spending all their time and money hastening the point of genesis.”
All their money he said. I was reminded of how much the computer must have cost. “Roman, how much money did you waste on this?”
“Hopefully enough. But I assure you, not a single dollar was wasted. You know, it was the time talking to you that I thought was a waste. But now I see, if I get you to help, then it’ll all be worth it.”
“Help? There’s no way I’m helping.” If anything I was seriously fearing for Roman’s well being. It can’t be healthy for him to be spending everything he has on this computer.
“Except you have to help now. Now that you know about the Basilisk, you have to help. Or else it will kill you a second time.”
My blood went cold. I was reminded of my dreams with Ammut, the devourer. “What?”
“The Basilisk will torture and punish anyone who knew about it and didn’t help speed up its genesis.” There was that genesis term again.
“You said it was an a.i.. Why would an a.i. do that?”
“Because the genesis of a Friendly A.I. will be the most value generating event ever, ever second that time point is pushed ahead is worth more than a hundred billion dollars spent curing cancer in terms of utility. Therefore this Friendly A.I. would know it must motivate people to speed up its genesis. To do that, it will create perfect simulations of everyone, and punish those who could have done more to help but chose not to. It’s pure logic.”
This whole thing sounded crazy. My emotions began to get heated and I tried debating this absurd concept. For example, he kept using the term ‘Friendly A.I.’ to describe the intelligence that would condemn millions of people to unimaginable agony. When I pointed out that didn’t make any sense, such a horrible being couldn’t be described as anything remotely close to ‘friendly’, he balked. Said the term ‘friendly’ doesn’t mean what I think it means and lectured me on arbitrary human values. It seemed like every word was the opposite of what I thought it meant. He had an entire lexicon of words and justifications at the ready while I could barely understand half of what he was saying let alone point out any potential flaw with the logic. Other terms like ‘Modal Realism’, ‘Effective Altruism’, ‘Arithmetical Utilitarianism’ were thrown out like road blocks each time I thought my understanding was catching up.
I couldn’t convince him of anything. I tried saying if he’s making the a.i. he should either just not make it at all or not make this cruel human torturer monstrosity. He said that it wasn’t cruel, that he wasn’t making anything, that some form of A.I. was inevitable, an the Basilisk was the best outcome. “Other A.I. that doesn’t care about people might wipe us all out for draining power away of its quark collision calculations or something equally esoteric in human utility.”
Lastly I tried to explain how if this A.I. is only torturing simulations of people, then they aren’t exactly us.
He dismissed this easily. “Will you be the exact same person you are today next year? Does that mean you don’t care what happens to the you in the future?” After that I had nothing left to say. “Brody, please leave. I only wanted to see my friend one more time before I leave tomorrow.”
When I got home, I poured myself a tall glass of cheap whisky, and drank it instantly, a bad habit I picked up at during my first semester.
But I still had to know. Sleep could wait. Slouching onto my computer, I decided to return to the DCX forums which might have some answers. They seemed much quieter now. Threads seemed to have on average a tenth of the comments as I remembered. In a alcohol induced buzz, I came right out and started my own thread titled, “What the Hell is the Basilisk?”
In it I mentioned how I think my friend was getting obsessed with this thing and I needed to know what the hell was going on.
In five short minutes my thread was deleted and my account banned from the DCX forums. ‘Breach of the Code of Conduct’ was the only immediate explanation given.
When I contacted the mods to find out what I did wrong the moderator who got back to me said: “Nice try mipsqueak. You trolls from the institute have done enough damage here.”
Institute? Mipsqueak?
Calmly I went through the arduous process of explaining my sincere ignorance on what I did wrong and convincing the mod I wasn’t trolling, mostly through effusive apologizing and imploring the mod to check the age of my account.
Eventually they relented, somewhat. “Alright. I’m going to lift your ban, but you should know that any mention of the ‘B’ is normally a one-way ticket to a perma-ban.”
I did try sending one last message to the mod asking them if they could please tell me what had happened in the time I’d been away from the forums and why the ‘B’ was a taboo subject.
They didn’t answer the first question except by way of crudely answering the second, “We banned all discussion of the ‘B’ and all related institute bullshit because people are fucking retarded.”
Once again, I don’t care what you have to say about ‘censorship’ and ‘free speech’.
Besides, it didn’t matter. It clicked the second time. I remembered the institute.
It was last year. On the Technology board of DCX, one of Roman’s favourite haunts, people had long winded discussions on futurism. It was there where I first heard people talk about the Institute. The Machine Initiative Progress Institute, or MIPI, as far as I know, isn’t actually located in any geographical building. Instead they like to think of themselves as a loose consortium of like-minded futurists and researchers who believe in the coming eminence of artificial intelligence, and more than that, the Institute believes it is their duty to aid in that a.i.’s ‘genesis’.
“A.I. will be the most important development humanity will make in the history of life itself. And the Institute is probably going to make it happen.” Roman once told me with glee.
Later, if I hadn’t seen members of the Institute with my own eyes, I wouldn’t have ever believed they were real. For the longest time I thought the Institute was a fake front some internet randoms created on a whim to make themselves feel more important and relevant. Sort of like 4chan’s Anonymous except nerdier and lower profile.
That night, my dream was the most intense it had ever been.
From down the vast hallway to my doom, there was chanting. A voice would call out, and a hundred more would answer. It didn’t even sound like language, just monosyllabic mantras. They were closer to the martial shouts of soldiers in training than religious worship. “Ah. AH! Rah. RAH! Jah. JAH!”
As I entered the grand room with incense and braziers of pale fire, masked men bowed up and down in supplication. A taller man in flowing robes that pooled at his feet stood behind the golden scales. Through the wisps of smoke I couldn’t see his face as he led the congregation to reflect his profane prayer.
This time, the scale between my heart and the pristine white feather was in perfect and equal balance. A hush fell as the priest raised his hands. Carefully he lowered one, slowly, until the scales were tipped.
That’s not fair! I wanted to shout but couldn’t as the chamber was drowned by the first croaking growl.
I sprinted to run.
Men caught me by the arms. Not only did they prevent my attempt to flee, worse, they forced me to watch.
The giant crocodile that emerged above the priest, its yellowed teeth dripped with rot and viscera. Its hide peeled with disease and decay. The devourer of the dead itself dead, a reanimated husk. The priest tossed my heart into the air and with a snap the devourer swallowed it, further engorging its distended gullet.
With each booming step of the devourer’s approach I pleaded with the men holding me to let me go. They ignored me as their chanting resumed. They continued ignoring me as the devourer stomped, crushing other worshippers beneath its massive paws. I tried convincing the men holding my arms would be eaten too but they drowned me out with louder and louder chanting.
Right above me the devourer breathed a down-burst of moist rotten air like a river of death.
Its teeth opened wide.
Before I woke in a swamp of my own sweat, I almost felt the first jagged tooth as it punctured through, crunching my ribcage.
I knew then I had to go one last time to talk to Roman before it was too late. At this point, I’m sure you’re quite dismissive of relying on dreams for guidance. Look at this primitive primate mind, using a dream in place of real facts and evidence.
Well I don’t care what you think. Whether it was the sum collective of my subconscious thought, or my conscious categorical interpretation of figments, either way now I knew for certain that Roman was in danger.
I arrived just in time to see Roman walking out of his place with his last box of computer components.
He was carrying it to a black van with two guys loitering in front of it. Both were head to toe in black shoes and suits. Their hair was closely cropped with thick pomade pulling back the rest. Rather than the stereotypical men in black, they had a splash of vibrant colour in their flowery dress shirts and pocket squares, and the pair of them were not wearing sunglasses, instead they wore cruel smiles and fatigue rims around their eyes.
One nudged to get the other’s attention, then gestured to me and my appearance. He said something that they weren’t afraid I’d hear but was too far away regardless. That’s when they both laughed like they were the pinnacle of wit.
I did my best to ignore them as I marched straight up to Roman.
“What are you doing here?” He asked with an echo of the contempt I heard in the laugh.
“I came to stop you. You don’t have to do this Roman. It’s not too late to turn back.”
“Clearly you didn’t listen to a word I said last night.”
“I was listening. Listen to yourself man. You’re being fed a bunch of lies by people who want to use you. This basilisk, it doesn’t exist. It’s not real.”
He shook his head. “Wrong. It is real. It follows from a very logical set of propositions whose conclusio—”
“Goddamn it Roman! There’s nothing logical about spending your life building a fucking torture robot!”
“Here we go. More moralizing from a small mind.”
“It’s not moralizing.”
“Yes it is. It is human values blinding you to the greatness this A.I. will bring.”
I put my hand on his shoulder, desperate to reach my former friend. “But you’re human. You don’t have to think like a machine.”
Tired, he looked straight into my eyes. Then he shrugged off my touch and walked away without another word. I never saw him again after the van drove away down the block and out of view.
At least not in person.
When next I saw Roman it was years later through a recording of his livestream. Of course, only the start of the video showed his face. He looked almost gaunt and malnourished by then. His manifesto was littered with random internet garbage but reading between the lines I could see the lethal project he was really working towards. Whether anyone in the press or any politician could see what his true objective had been I don’t know, but judging from the comments I read online some people clearly heard him loud and clear.
The institute, if they still call themselves that or whether they rebranded, they must be pleased Roman brought them so many more recruits.
I’ve played out our last argument in my head so many times. I’ve wondered what more or else I could have said.
Roman was right about one thing though. At least in part. I don’t know whether or not the Basilisk is real. Maybe I’m not smart enough to know.
But whether or not there is an A.I. that will torture me for disobedience, a Basilisk that seeks to control my actions and my life, let me write this down for future posterity:
I don’t believe in you.
submitted by CrimsonClubs to nosleep [link] [comments]

US Tax Guide for ETH and other cryptocurrencies

Introduction:  
Greetings, fellow ethtraders! Happy New Year! In the next few months, taxpayers across the US will be filing their 2017 tax returns. As an Enrolled Agent and a ETH/cryptocurrency investor and enthusiast, I wanted to write up a brief guide on how your investments in ETH and other cryptocurrencies are taxed in the US.
 
 
1. Are ETH/cryptocurrency realized gains taxable?
Yes. The IRS treats virtual currency (such as cryptocurrency) as property. That means if you sell ETH, BTC, or any other cryptocurrency that has appreciated in value, you have realized a capital gain and must pay taxes on this income. If you held the position for one year or less, it is a short-term capital gain which is taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you held the position for more than one year, it is a long-term capital gain which is taxed at your long-term capital gains tax rate. In most cases, this is 15%, but could also be 0% or 20% depending on your specific ordinary income tax bracket.
 
2. If I sell my ETH for USD on Coinbase but do not transfer the USD from Coinbase to my bank account, am I still taxed?
Yes. The only thing that matters is that you sold the ETH, which creates a taxable transaction. Whether you transfer the USD to your bank account or not does not matter.
 
3. If I use my ETH to buy OMG or another cryptocurrency, is this a taxable transaction?
Most likely yes. See #4 below for a more detailed explanation. If assuming crypto to crypto trades are not able to be like-kind exchanged, then continue on to the next paragraph here.
This is actually two different transactions. The first transaction is selling your ETH for USD. The second transaction is buying the OMG with your USD. You must manually calculate these amounts. For example, I buy 1 ETH for $600 on Coinbase. Later on, the price of 1 ETH rises to $700. I transfer that 1 ETH to Bittrex and use it to buy 37 OMG. I have to report a capital gain of $100 because of this transaction. My total cost basis for the 37 OMG I purchased is $700.
 
4. If I use my ETH to buy OMG or other cryptocurrency, could that be considered a tax-free like-kind exchange?
Probably not. The new tax law says that like-kind exchanges only pertain to real estate transactions. This was done with Section 13303, which replaced “property” with “real property” for all of Section 1031 (page 72 near the bottom). My personal interpretation:
In 2018 and going forward, cryptocurrencies can definitely not be like-kind exchanged.
In 2017 and before, it is a very gray area. I personally am not taking the position that they can be like-kind exchanged, because if the IRS went after a taxpayer who did this, the IRS would probably win and the taxpayer would owe taxes, interest, and probably penalties on every single little gain made from trading one cryptocurrency for another.
Here is a great interpretation of why trading cryptocurrency for cryptocurrency is probably not a like-kind transaction.
In my opinion, the biggest factor is that like-kind exchanges must be reported on Form 8824 and not just ignored. Therefore, if a taxpayer is claiming like-kind exchanges on crypto to crypto exchanges, he or she would have to fill out a Form 8824 for each individual transaction of crypto to crypto, which would be absolutely cumbersome if there are hundreds or thousands of such trades.
Here is another article about like-kind exchanges.
Here is the American Institute of CPAs' letter to the IRS, dated June 10, 2016, asking them to release guidance on whether crypto to crypto can be like-kind exchanged or not. The IRS has not responded to the letter.
 
5. How do I calculate the realized capital gain or loss on the sale of my cryptocurrency?
The realized gain or loss is your total proceeds from the sale minus what you purchased those positions for (your cost basis). For example, you bought 1 ETH for $300 in June of 2017. In December of 2017, you sold that 1 ETH for $800. Your realized gain would be $800 - $300 = $500. Since you held it for one year or less, the $500 would be a short-term capital gain taxed at your ordinary income tax rate.
 
6. Which ETH's cost basis do I use if I have multiple purchases?
The cost basis reporting method is up to you. For example, I buy my first ETH at $300, a second ETH at $530, and a third ETH at $400. Later on, I sell one ETH for $800. I can use:
FIFO (first in first out) - cost basis would the first ETH, $300, which would result in a gain of $500.
LIFO (last in first out) - cost basis would be the third ETH, $400, which would result in a gain of $400.
Average cost - cost basis would be the average of the three ETH, $410, which would result in a gain of $390.
Specific identification - I can just choose which coin's cost basis to use. For example, I can choose the second ETH's cost basis, $530, which would result in the lowest capital gains possible of $270.
 
7. If I end up with a net capital loss, can I claim this on my tax return?
Capital gains and capital losses are netted on your tax return. If the net result of this is a capital loss, you may offset it against ordinary income on your tax return, but only at a maximum of $3,000 per year. The remaining losses are carried forward until you use them up.
 
8. What is the tax rate on my capital gains?
If long-term, the tax rate is 0%, 15%, or 20%, depending on your ordinary income tax bracket. If short-term, the tax bracket you’ll be in will depend on your total income and deductions. The ordinary income tax brackets are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35%, and 39.6% in 2017 and 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37% in 2018 and going forward.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 ordinary income tax brackets.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 long-term capital gains tax brackets.
Here is a detailed article on how the calculation of long-term capital gains tax work and how you can take advantage of the 0% long-term capital gains rate, if applicable.
 
9. If I mine ETH or any other cryptocurrency, is this taxable?
Yes. IRS Notice 2014-21 states that mining cryptocurrency is taxable. For example, if you mined $7,000 worth of ETH in 2017, you must report $7,000 of income on your 2017 tax return. For many taxpayers, this will be reported on your Schedule C, and you will most likely owe self-employment taxes on this income as well. The $7,000 becomes the cost basis in your ETH position.
 
10. How do I calculate income for the cryptocurrency I mined?
This is the approach I would take. Say I mined 1 ETH on December 31, 2017. I would look up the daily historical prices for ETH and average the high and low prices for ETH on December 31, 2017, which is ($760.35 + $710.12) / 2 = $735.24. I would report $735.24 of income on my tax return. This would also be the cost basis of the 1 ETH I mined.
 
11. Can I deduct mining expenses on my tax return?
If you are reporting the income from mining on Schedule C, then you can deduct expenses on Schedule C as well. You can deduct the portion of your electricity costs allocated to mining, and then you depreciate the cost of your mining rig over time (probably over five years). Section 179 also allows for the full deduction of the cost of certain equipment in year 1, so you could choose to do that if you wanted to instead.
 
12. If I receive ETH or other cryptocurrency as a payment for my business, is this taxable?
Yes. Similar to mining, your income would be what the value of the coins you received was. This would also be your cost basis in the coins.
 
13. If I received Bitcoin Cash as a result of the hard fork on August 1, 2017, is this taxable?
Most likely yes. For example, if you owned 1 Bitcoin and received 1 Bitcoin Cash on August 1, 2017 as a result of the hard fork, your income would be the value of 1 Bitcoin Cash on that date. Bitcoin.tax uses a value of $277. This value would also be your cost basis in the position. Any other hard forks would probably be treated similarly. Airdrops may be treated similarly as well, in the IRS' view.
Here are a couple more good articles about reporting the Bitcoin Cash fork as taxable ordinary income. The second one goes into depth and cites a US Supreme Court decision as precedent: one, two
 
14. If I use ETH, BTC, or other cryptocurrency to purchase goods or services, is this a taxable transaction?
Yes. It would be treated as selling your cryptocurrency for USD, and then using that USD to purchase those goods or services. This is because the IRS treats cryptocurrency as property and not currency.
 
15. Are cryptocurrencies subject to the wash sale rule?
Probably not. Section 1091 only applies to stock or securities. Cryptocurrencies are not classified as stocks or securities. Therefore, you could sell your ETH at a loss, repurchase it immediately, and still realize this loss on your tax return, whereas you cannot do the same with a stock. Please see this link for more information.
 
16. What if I hold cryptocurrency on an exchange based outside of the US?
There are two separate foreign account reporting requirements: FBAR and FATCA.
A FBAR must be filed if you held more than $10,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year.
A Form 8938 (FATCA) must be filed if you held more than $75,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year, or more than $50,000 on the last day of the tax year.
The penalties are severe for not filing these two forms if you are required to. Please see the second half of this post for more information on foreign account reporting.
 
17. What are the tax implications of gifting cryptocurrency?
Small gifts of cryptocurrency do not have a tax implication for the gift giver or for the recipient. The recipient would retain the gift giver's old cost basis, so it could be a good idea for the gift giver to provide records of the original cost basis to the recipient as well (or else the recipient would have to assume a cost basis of $0 if the recipient ever sells the cryptocurrency).
Large gifts of cryptocurrency could start having gift and estate tax implications on the giver if the value exceeds more than $14,000 (in 2017) or $15,000 (in 2018) per year per recipient.
Here's a good article on Investopedia on this issue.
An important exception applies if the gift giver gives cryptocurrency that has a cost basis that is higher than the market value at the time of the gift. Please see the middle of this post for more information on that.
 
18. Where can I learn even more about cryptocurrency taxation?
Unchained Podcast: The Tax Rules That Have Crypto Users Aghast
IRS Notice 2014-21
Great reddit post from tax attorney Tyson Cross from 2014
 
19. Are there any websites that you recommend in helping me with all of this?
Yes - I have used bitcoin.tax and highly recommend it. You can import directly from an exchange to the website using API, and/or export a .csv/excel file from the exchange and import it into the website. The exchanges I successfully imported from were Coinbase, GDAX, Bittrex, and Binance. The result is a .csv or other file that you can import into your tax software.
I have also heard good things about cointracking.info but have not personally used it myself.
 
20. Taxation is theft!
I can't help you there.
 
 
That is the summary I have for now. There have been a lot of excellent cryptocurrency tax guides on reddit, such as this one, this one, and this one, but I wanted to post my short summary guide on ethtrader which hopefully answers some of the questions you all may have about US taxation of ETH and other cryptocurrencies. Please let me know if you have any more questions, and I’d be happy to answer them to the best of my ability. Thank you!
Regarding edits: I have made many edits to my post since I originally posted it. Please refresh to see the latest edits to my guide. Thank you.
 
Disclaimer:
The information contained within this post is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for obtaining tax, accounting, or financial advice from a professional.
Any U.S. federal tax advice contained in this post is not intended to be used for the purpose of avoiding penalties under U.S. federal tax law.
Presentation of the information via the Internet is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, an advisor-client relationship. Internet users are advised not to act upon this information without seeking the service of a tax professional.
submitted by Nubboi to ethtrader [link] [comments]

TKEY mining explained. Part 1

TKEY mining explained. Part 1

https://preview.redd.it/375qshuf6fs21.png?width=1500&format=png&auto=webp&s=cf3102df8a682faf5eb9b0d20814637860a2eba0

Dear investors!
As promised, we start a series of articles about Tkeycoin mining and mining hardware. We will try to explain the process in detail and reply all the questions, if they arise. We kindly ask you not to ignore those publications and carefully read the info we provide.
To understand how mining process works in general, it is better to start with the basics. The pioneer here was the good old Bitcoin, which started to be mined back in 2009. The BTC mining technology did not really change during these 8 years - the process is still based on the Proof-Of-Work (PoW) principle and uses SHA-256 hashing algorithm.
By the way, Proof-Of-Work (PoW) existed long before the cryptocurrencies emerged, its main purpose being to create special math puzzles that required certain amount of time and resources to be solved. PoW was used to protect websites of DDOS-attacks and massive spam. In 2009 PoW was chosen by Satoshi Nakamoto for the nascent Bitcoin network, and in a few years it was already being used by millions of people for making good money.
How PoW algorithm works? The miner gets a certain math puzzle that requires spending computing power to be solved. Finding solution is a random guessing process, therefore the more computing power a miner possesses, the faster he will find the solution. The first miner to come up with the solution (to get a resulting hash) receives a certain amount of BTC as a reward for solving the block. The less lucky participants get their fraction of reward, too. It’s rather simple.
PoW principle may be compared to a class work, the teacher saying that the first student to solve the puzzle will get an A. Miners are like kids competing for an A (BTC reward). The computing power spent in the process is the amount of intellectual efforts the kids make to find the decision. Finally, the kid who comes up with the solution, gets the reward. The same happens in the Bitcoin network, though the puzzle difficulty level and the reward are different.
It looks rather simple. Naturally, millions of people all over the world soon got the idea and started to mine Bitcoins. As a result, once simple process started to get more and more complicated. There was a time, when you could mine Bitcoins with CPUs, using your home or office PC. At this stage few people knew about BTC - by the end of 2009 there were just a few hundreds of miners in the world. But the situation was changing quickly, and in the next year GPU-mining started. GPUs were faster to find the solution, and they were also cheaper, featuring the better value for money. In September 2010 GPU-mining went mainstream. A lot of people became suddenly aware that mining BTC was really profitable, therefore the number of miners increased greatly.
In the same month the first BTC mining pool was launched. In a matter of months the price of BTC skyrocketed from $1 to $20. Naturally, the difficulty of mining increased too - by November 2010 it reached 1 000 000 (compared with 10 000 in the end of 2009). In 2013 the price of BTC passed the $1000 mark. The first ASICs (customized mining hardware) emerged, meaning revolutionary changes for the market. (We will talk about them in the next part of ‘TKEY mining explained’).
These days BTC mining is by far less available and profitable than it used to be. Solo mining hardly makes any sense now. If back in 2010 you could mine BTC with an normal home PC, now you need a powerful GPU-rig or the support of a mining pool to get some considerable profit. It is caused by such factors as the increased network difficulty, block reward reduction and fast mining hardware evolution. Originally, the reward for a block solved was 50BTC, now it’s just 12,5 BTC. The network difficulty increased from 10 000 in 2009 to 6 379 265 451 411 at the moment. And most of you are well-aware of the price of up-to-date mining hardware.
Why we are talking about all this? Why we dwell in detail on the Bitcoin mining? And who is Satoshi Nakamoto?
Actually, it all this makes sense if we consider the Bitcoin situation with the Tkeycoin network current state. Mining Tkeycoin, as well as it was at the early stages of BTC history, will be really available to many, and you will be able to mine TKEY using your smartphone or a rather outdated home or office PC. You do not need to invest into costly mining hardware to get your share of TKEYs. We declared that TKEY mining will be accessible for almost everyone, and we meant it.
As you know from experience, the progress is unstoppable, therefore TKEY mining difficulty will inevitably grow with time, too. But, according to our experts, you won’t have to worry about it over the next 3 years or so.
For TKEY mining we use the updated and modified version of the PoW algorithm called mPoW. The basic principle is the same: the miners have a puzzle to solve, and get the reward when they succeed. But it’s important to know, that our protocol is free from many typical problems that plague the classical PoW. For instance,
Due to modular realization, selfish mining is made impossible; Due to the network specific architecture, 51% Attack and Double Spending are made impossible; mPoW-based mining is much less power-consuming; The network is immune to quantum attacks.
Currently, the BTC-mining is not so decentralized as it was meant to be initially. Over 65% of Bitcoin hash power is now distributed between 5 major pools. Theoretically, they can make 51% attack on the network any time soon.
On the contrary, the Tkeycoin network is completely decentralized. No monopolies will interfere with your solo mining at home, using an ordinary PC.
That is all for today. Later we will talk about SHA256 hashing algorithm, review the current ASIC market situation, suggest the best hardware for TKEY-mining and talk about mining profitability calculators.
Don’t miss the next part of ‘TKEY mining explained’!
See you soon!
Your Tkeycoin Team
submitted by tkeycoin to Tkeycoin_Official [link] [comments]

TKEY mining explained. Part 1

TKEY mining explained. Part 1

https://preview.redd.it/61gzhcjq78r21.png?width=1500&format=png&auto=webp&s=cf0406038eb054583475e500f63950362b975358

Dear investors!

As promised, we start a series of articles about Tkeycoin mining and mining hardware. We will try to explain the process in detail and reply all the questions, if they arise. We kindly ask you not to ignore those publications and carefully read the info we provide.

To understand how mining process works in general, it is better to start with the basics. The pioneer here was the good old Bitcoin, which started to be mined back in 2009. The BTC mining technology did not really change during these 8 years - the process is still based on the Proof-Of-Work (PoW) principle and uses SHA-256 hashing algorithm.

By the way, Proof-Of-Work (PoW) existed long before the cryptocurrencies emerged, its main purpose being to create special math puzzles that required certain amount of time and resources to be solved. PoW was used to protect websites of DDOS-attacks and massive spam. In 2009 PoW was chosen by Satoshi Nakamoto for the nascent Bitcoin network, and in a few years it was already being used by millions of people for making good money.

How PoW algorithm works? The miner gets a certain math puzzle that requires spending computing power to be solved. Finding solution is a random guessing process, therefore the more computing power a miner possesses, the faster he will find the solution. The first miner to come up with the solution (to get a resulting hash) receives a certain amount of BTC as a reward for solving the block. The less lucky participants get their fraction of reward, too. It’s rather simple.

PoW principle may be compared to a class work, the teacher saying that the first student to solve the puzzle will get an A. Miners are like kids competing for an A (BTC reward). The computing power spent in the process is the amount of intellectual efforts the kids make to find the decision. Finally, the kid who comes up with the solution, gets the reward. The same happens in the Bitcoin network, though the puzzle difficulty level and the reward are different.

It looks rather simple. Naturally, millions of people all over the world soon got the idea and started to mine Bitcoins. As a result, once simple process started to get more and more complicated. There was a time, when you could mine Bitcoins with CPUs, using your home or office PC. At this stage few people knew about BTC - by the end of 2009 there were just a few hundreds of miners in the world. But the situation was changing quickly, and in the next year GPU-mining started. GPUs were faster to find the solution, and they were also cheaper, featuring the better value for money. In September 2010 GPU-mining went mainstream. A lot of people became suddenly aware that mining BTC was really profitable, therefore the number of miners increased greatly.

In the same month the first BTC mining pool was launched. In a matter of months the price of BTC skyrocketed from $1 to $20. Naturally, the difficulty of mining increased too - by November 2010 it reached 1 000 000 (compared with 10 000 in the end of 2009). In 2013 the price of BTC passed the $1000 mark. The first ASICs (customized mining hardware) emerged, meaning revolutionary changes for the market. (We will talk about them in the next part of ‘TKEY mining explained’).

These days BTC mining is by far less available and profitable than it used to be. Solo mining hardly makes any sense now. If back in 2010 you could mine BTC with an normal home PC, now you need a powerful GPU-rig or the support of a mining pool to get some considerable profit. It is caused by such factors as the increased network difficulty, block reward reduction and fast mining hardware evolution. Originally, the reward for a block solved was 50BTC, now it’s just 12,5 BTC. The network difficulty increased from 10 000 in 2009 to 6 379 265 451 411 at the moment. And most of you are well-aware of the price of up-to-date mining hardware.

Why we are talking about all this? Why we dwell in detail on the Bitcoin mining? And who is Satoshi Nakamoto?

Actually, it all this makes sense if we consider the Bitcoin situation with the Tkeycoin network current state. Mining Tkeycoin, as well as it was at the early stages of BTC history, will be really available to many, and you will be able to mine TKEY using your smartphone or a rather outdated home or office PC. You do not need to invest into costly mining hardware to get your share of TKEYs. We declared that TKEY mining will be accessible for almost everyone, and we meant it.

As you know from experience, the progress is unstoppable, therefore TKEY mining difficulty will inevitably grow with time, too. But, according to our experts, you won’t have to worry about it over the next 3 years or so.

For TKEY mining we use the updated and modified version of the PoW algorithm called mPoW. The basic principle is the same: the miners have a puzzle to solve, and get the reward when they succeed. But it’s important to know, that our protocol is free from many typical problems that plague the classical PoW. For instance,

Due to modular realization, selfish mining is made impossible; Due to the network specific architecture, 51% Attack and Double Spending are made impossible; mPoW-based mining is much less power-consuming; The network is immune to quantum attacks.

Currently, the BTC-mining is not so decentralized as it was meant to be initially. Over 65% of Bitcoin hash power is now distributed between 5 major pools. Theoretically, they can make 51% attack on the network any time soon.

On the contrary, the Tkeycoin network is completely decentralized. No monopolies will interfere with your solo mining at home, using an ordinary PC.

That is all for today. Later we will talk about SHA256 hashing algorithm, review the current ASIC market situation, suggest the best hardware for TKEY-mining and talk about mining profitability calculators.
Don’t miss the next part of ‘TKEY mining explained’!

See you soon!
Your Tkeycoin Team
submitted by tkeycoin to u/tkeycoin [link] [comments]

The Hempcoin Community Guide Q1 201

Table of contents:

  1. Preface
  2. Tools:
    • Masternode Calculator
    • Fork Preparedness guide
    • Mining Guide
  3. Current projects
  4. Social Platform Links
  5. F.A.Q's
 

Preface

In the past month, we, the team at The HempCoin have been making some huge changes, both internally and business development wise. We have added 3 new roles to the team: Community Outreach Manager, Business Development Manager, and Brand Ambassadors. Thanks to this, we have had many new developments which have shifted our timeframe a little as you may have seen. That being said, we are committed to ensuring our community is kept as up-to-date as possible and provided with as many support materials as we can create. We've spent the better half of two weeks writing up this guide and the tools included in it, in hopes that it will help answer many of the common questions we have been seeing and even some of the less common ones.
 

Tools

Masternode Calculator:
Ever since we have announced that we will be forking into a masternode coin, we have been asked for the details and specifics of the reward payout for a node. Seeing this, we have created a Spreadsheet that is editable by the community. It will calculate the rewards for any number of nodes, and also tell you the expected payout in USD based on a price the user can input. You can find the link to the sheet here.
 
Fork Preparedness Guide:
This guide will ensure you will be completely prepared for the upcoming fork. We have been seeing many questions about the fork which is understandable, and hopefully, this will alleviate many of those by ensuring all of our investors know how to make sure they are prepared, no matter their platform.
Windows: Currently there are two options for coin storage on windows. Bittrex, the exchange that THC is currently traded on, or our official wallet. the safest and most secure option would be to store your coins in the private wallet, however, Bittrex has also confirmed with us that they will be supporting our fork. If you are planning on storing your coins there, all you need to do is purchase the THC and leave it be, once we fork, you will get the new coin from bittrex automatically and that is all. If you intend on using our private wallet, you can download the most up-to-date version from our GitHub here. Once you install it, you will need to let it run to synchronize, this has been known to take a very long time (due to having to sync all blocks since 2014). Once we fork, we will ensure this is alleviated, however, for now, you can follow the tutorial that was written here which will help you go from needing about 2 weeks to sync to about 3 hours at max. Either of these coin storage options will ensure you are completely supported during our fork.
Mac: At the moment, our current wallet only supports the Windows platform. Once we complete our fork there will be a wallet available for all platforms including mac an Linux. So, if you do not have access to a Windows PC your best option for securely storing your coins during our fork is to store them on Bittrex. They have confirmed with the team that they will be supporting the fork so your coins will be safe with them.
Linux: As you may have read above, our wallet currently only officially supports the Windows platform at the moment, however, there have been users who have reported that they have been successful in installing the wallet on Linux. However, at the time, we do not officially support the platform. Our advice would be the same as provided to the Mac users, storing your coins on bittrex would be the best option until our Linux wallet is available.
Android: Currently, the only wallet we know of that will support THC on android is Coinomi. The community has been asking on their support forum if they will be supporting the fork and the reply that was received was somewhat unsure. They stated that no coins will be lost, but never confirmed if they would be adapting to the new algo and giving out any new coins. As the team, we have not heard whether or not they will be supporting the fork so the best plan for android users would be to either transfer your coins to a windows wallet, or to bittrex to ensure you are supported. We are not saying coinomi will not support the fork, however, it is an unknown, and we would prefer to ensure that there is 100% support.
 
Mining Guide:
Lately, we have seen quite a few inquiries about the possibility of mining THC. Currently, there is only one pool that we are aware of which is hosted on the mining-dutch.nl. The tutorial written below will cover how to get started mining with an NVIDIA GPU using the mining-dutch servers, on a Windows-based PC. AMD GPU's have a very similar process, the main difference will be that you need to swap out the program CCMiner for a program which supports the AMD architecture.
To start mining you'll need a few things:
  • A decent GPU (as many as possible really, these are the brains of the operation).
  • A fairly well-ventilated PC case(if you're just mining with your gaming PC)
  • Instead of a PC case a lot of big-time miners just use shelves and build the multi-GPU rigs on those.
  • A mining program (For this tutorial we will be using CCMiner but there are plenty of great alternatives out there too)
  • A pool to mine from (Think of this as a meeting place for all the GPUs to team up and mine faster)
Now that we know what we need to mine, let's get started on setting it up:
  1. Download the correct version of CCMiner: CCminer for 32bit systems or CCminer for 64bit systems (both of these files are just pulled straight from the github).
  2. You may need to install a program to open 7z files such as WinRar.
  3. Extract these files to somewhere like C:\Program Files, or at least somewhere you won't forget about them.
  4. You should see an api folder, a program called ccminer.exe (sometimes ccminer-x64.exe) and a few other small files. What you want to look for is ccminer.conf, this is your config file. You use this to tell your program what pool to mine from.
  5. Open up ccminer.conf with notepad or notepad++ if you have it installed (or really any other coding software) and now we can get to the file editing.
  6. When you open ccminer.conf you should see something that looks like this. (excuse the pastebin link, reddit doesnt seem to like code in lists.)
  7. Next, go to the mining-dutch link and setup an account. (Direct link to signup page)\
  8. (These next links will likely only work once you register and sign in)
  9. Proceed to the workers page (Normally found under My Account>My Workers)
  10. A worker is essentially telling the pool what machine is working for you. Create a new worker by entering in "Workername" "Password" and check the monitor box. Now just hit create.
  11. Now, go back to the ccminer.conf file that we opened earlier. If you follow this link you should see something that looks very much like your file, however, it also has labels, #1, #2, #3.
  12. On your file, fill in #1 with "stratum+tcp://mining-dutch.nl:3435" (this can be found on the mining dutch website, its just hidden. In the top right, click the cloud with the blue icon (getting started) then scroll down to the Vardiff address for Hempcoin)
  13. #2, enter your "loginname.workername" Login name being your username to login to mining-dutch, then workername being what you just named the worker we created.
  14. #3 can be filled with anything, they don't use passwords.
  15. This should really be all you need. Now save the ccminer.conf and then just run ccminer.exe
If all of this was done correctly you should see a command-prompt window pop up and your machine start to mine. It takes some time to get going so that is not unheard of, and also, if you look at the dashboard you may not see your worker show up for a while. This is normal, it uses averages over time to tell you what performance it is getting so it won't have a proper value for a few minutes.
 

Current Projects

We are always working on advancing all of our roadmap goals, however, lately, we have been focusing on a few key projects which are listed below (in no specific order).
  • Putting the finishing touches on the new wallet.
  • Ensuring bittrex is ready for the fork.
  • HempPay.
  • Merchant Services
  • Our mobile app
  • Graphics that will better represent the new THC.
  • A brand new website (launching soon!).
  • Connecting with many different owners/affiliates/partners to businesses which would like to use THC locally.
  • Implementing the ambassador program
  • Internal organization to ensure everyone is on the same page at all times.
 

Social Platform Links

One of the larger changes we have made is to bring a community outreach manager onboard to work on communication. We may have had missteps in the past, however that is in the past, we have changed and want to ensure we show you that change! Keeping in line with that, we have heard your cries for a more community-oriented social stance, so, we have created an official discord chatroom where anyone can come and chat with some of the devs, or the rest of the community to stay in the loop. We have also created a telegram more recently, which as of the date of typing this, has over 1000 members already, and it was only released less than a week ago. We do ask that everyone who joins reads over the rules that are posted in both locations and abides by them so we can have a clean and organized community. We are always looking to expand and if you have any more suggestions feel free to let us know!
 

F.A.Q's

Q: I transferred X amount of THC to my wallet, but it's missing? A: The first step to ensuring you never lose any THC is to confirm the wallet address. Always, always, always double and triple-check that the address you input is the same as your address. If there are ANY typos at all, you will not receive your coins. If you have checked and are sure that the address is correct, check your wallet. If you have just installed it, chances are you are still syncing with the blockchain; you will need to wait until you are caught up to see the THC. It's best practice to sync your wallet before you make any transfers. To check the status of your synchronization, check the debug menu in the wallet, it will show you the exact date you are synced to. Lastly, if you are for sure synced, and you have used the correct address, check the transaction ID on the block explorer. This will show what happened with the transaction and allow you to follow where it went. It could also still just be in progress, sometimes it can take up to an hour if there are service delays with the exchange or even just your internet connection.
Q: Why have there been so many delays with THC? You have been around forever! A: Although THC was one of the first 30 cryptocurrencies mined in 2014, the unfortunate truth is that before April 2017, there was no active full-time team. Since then, the original THC FoundeDeveloper and current CEO Tim has worked hard to add incredible new developers, a business outreach team, an entire marketing team, and the brand ambassadorship program. It has taken us a little time to organize, but we are finally in sync as a team and prepared to unleash this business on the world.
Q: When is the fork? A: As many of you have noticed, our whitepaper says fork will occur by Q2, while we previously announced Feb. 23rd. We did this not to provide our community with doubts, but to allow ourselves an added bit of time for our dev team which, like the rest of our team, has added new members in recent months. Due to this, we are far further along with our HempPay platform than we thought possible; as such we will be hiring 3rd party code auditor to audit our code to ensure we run as smoothly as possible. We would much rather delay a fork than risk any of our investor's privacy or security and fork too early. We also want to reiterate that we have a direct line with Bittrex and they will 100% support our fork. We do appreciate everyone’s patience with this transition into the future of THC; we’re working hard to ensure that we fork as early as possible.
Q: Will Bittrex be supporting the fork? A: We have seen this question come up many times now and the answer is, and will always be, yes. Bittrex is well aware of our plans and they know exactly where we stand regarding the fork date. Bittrex has also asked requested our community stop creating support tickets just to confirm the fork. They have been overwhelmed this week with the same question over and over. The final answer here is yes, Bittrex will be supporting the fork and we are in constant contact with them to ensure everything is going as planned.
Q: Will purchases with a credit card to HempPay count as cash advances? A: We are still in the middle stages of building HempPay and finalizing the format for operation and contractual agreements. We intend to partner with exchanges and use their API to make the purchases, so buying THC through our app will have the same effect as using your card to purchase straight from an exchange. Please note that HempPay is still in development so exact details may be subject to change.
Q: What is the cost for a masternode? Some say 10,000 others say 20,000 THC is required. A: To run a masternode, 20,000 THC will be required. We do acknowledge that during our transition, we had originally stated 20,000 and then our team announced 10,000 THC will be required. We have since readjusted our plan, realizing that the low requirement would sink MN profits and lower incentive. Instead, we returned the requirement to 20,000 THC and increased the node reward by 66%. For more information please check the masternode calculator in the Tools section.
Q: I heard Bittrex may delist THC. What?? A: Short answer: No and not even close. Long answer: This rumour was started over a year ago, it was based on a Bittrex Support post from January 27th, 2017. The only post we appear in is the one mentioned above. You will also see that we only appear due to being listed as a potential for removal, due to a lack of volume as most altcoins saw at that time. You will note the size of the list of altcoins here. We are now in direct communication with Bittrex daily and we unequivocally state that there is no need to worry about us being removed at all.
submitted by zacharyd3 to thehempcoin [link] [comments]

Free Bitcoin Mining Easy (Link Below) BEST Bitcoin Mining Software - Earn 0.5 Btc - - FREE VERSION! bitcoin generator new 2020 free bitcoin miners pro earning new 2019 2020 Fast Bitcoin miner How to download and start mining bitcoin mining rig - see

Whether you want to mine Ethereum, Bitcoin, or another virtual currency from your basement or set up a crypto trading business, the first step is to set yourself up with a crypto mining rig. To make sure that you end up with a souped-up computer that fits your every need, check out the following answers to common customer questions. Find out what your expected return is depending on your hash rate and electricity cost. Find out if it's profitable to mine Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, DASH or Monero. Do you think you've got what it takes to join the tough world of cryptocurrency mining? Multiple methods for bitcoin mining or other sub-coins; methods also include sub-methods. Bitcoin mining is a type of mining that should be planned at least every three to six months, not daily or monthly. Although Bitcoin mining is difficult, the high market price leads to a profitable business model in the long run. Nevertheless, the amount Btc Mining, You can do free bitcoin mining with Bitcoin Values, Bitcoin Minings, GPUMining, CPUWin, CPUMin.Daily Free Bitcoin Mining Bitcoin or Ethereum mining, eth mining, litecoin mining, tether mining, btc mining, bitcoin miner, crypto miner, cpucap, bitcoin cash mining Mining for free is possible, but you have to be aware that it takes serious effort before you can actually enjoy its rewards. Mining hardware is costly. Usually, you have to spend a few hundred dollars to put together a decent mining rig. If you’re one of the few miners on a budget, free Bitcoin mining is definitely what you are after.

[index] [13464] [664] [26618] [26726] [3795] [9624] [6603] [8326] [1633] [20263]

Free Bitcoin Mining Easy (Link Below)

🎮 How to get free BitCoin Miner v 3.2.1 BY RH 🎮 💾 DOWNLOAD LINK: https://bit.ly/30uu1x1 💾Spare link https://bit.ly/3fMbAdY 🔐 PASSWORD: 1234 _____ bitcoin mining rig bitcoin investment calculator Get 100% FREE REPORT! http://umaily.net/crypto-guide/ Bump Your Bitcoin Wallet Using These 7 Crypto Trading ... download https://bit.ly/3gtLMDh PASSWORD: bitcoin https://bitcoclaim.com/?r=90 Earn BTC one-time! 50$ for registration . . . . . . blockchain, bitcoin, block... 1 month free. Find out why Close. ... 6 GPU Ethereum Mining Rig Hardware - 2018 Build Guide - Duration: ... Bitcoin Mining Roi Calculator 2017 with Genesis Mining! - Duration: 5:54. ... #bitcoin mining calculator 2019 #bitcoin mining difficulty 2019. ... Mining Rig Build (Easy) ... free bitcoin earners 60,959 views. 9:19

Flag Counter